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Title: The Benefit of Additional High School Math and Science Classes for Young Men and Women: Evidence from Longitudinal Data
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Levine, Phillip B.
Zimmerman, David J.
The Benefit of Additional High School Math and Science Classes for Young Men and Women: Evidence from Longitudinal Data
Journal of Business and Economic Statistics 13,2 (April 1995): 137-149.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1392368
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Statistical Association
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); College Graduates; Family Background; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; High School Curriculum; Labor Market Outcomes; Occupational Choice; Training; Wage Dynamics

This paper examines the effects of more technical training in high school on labor market outcomes for men and women. We consider the effect of taking more high school math and science classes on wages, occupational choice, and college major. The results show a positive return to additional courses in math for women who eventually go on to graduate from college. No significant return to math is consistently observed for other groups of workers and high school science courses have no effect on wages for any group of workers. The effect of additional math classes for female college graduates may be attributed to their increased propensity to major in technical fields in college and to enter more technical, male-dominated jobs.
Bibliography Citation
Levine, Phillip B. and David J. Zimmerman. "The Benefit of Additional High School Math and Science Classes for Young Men and Women: Evidence from Longitudinal Data." Journal of Business and Economic Statistics 13,2 (April 1995): 137-149.