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Source: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Boynton, Marcella H.
Arkes, Jeremy
Hoyle, Rick H.
Brief Report of a Test of Differential Alcohol Risk Using Sibling Attributions of Paternal Alcoholism
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 72,6 (November 2011): 1037-1040.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Brief_Report_of_a_Test_of_Differential_Alcohol_Risk_Using_Sibling_Attributi/4640.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Fathers; Fathers, Influence; Modeling, Multilevel; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Parental alcoholism is generally found to be a strong predictor of alcohol misuse. Although the majority of siblings agree on the presence of parental alcohol issues, there is a significant minority who do not.

Method: The current study analyzed sibling data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth using multilevel modeling, which accounts for the nested structure of the data. These analyses permitted a test of whether (a) identifying one's father as an alcoholic predicted greater risk of alcohol problems, (b) being from a family whose siblings did not all agree on the presence of paternal alcoholism increased the likelihood of alcohol problems, and (c) risk of alcohol misuse significantly differed among individuals from families in which there was familial disagreement about paternal alcoholism.

Results: Results show that individuals who identified their father as an alcoholic were themselves more likely to have alcohol issues as compared with individuals both within and between families who did not identify their father as an alcoholic. Risk was similar for individuals in families in which there was disagreement about paternal alcoholism compared with individuals from families in which everyone agreed on the presence of paternal alcoholism. Moreover, there was not a significant interaction between paternal alcoholism attributions and familial disagreement.

Conclusions: Findings indicate that in the case of child reports of paternal alcoholism, the increased risk of alcohol problems holds true regardless of the accuracy of an individual's assessment. These results may be not only because of the impact of paternal alcoholism on a person's alcohol misuse but also because of a person's alcohol problems potentially influencing his or her perceptions of familial alcohol-related behaviors.

Bibliography Citation
Boynton, Marcella H., Jeremy Arkes and Rick H. Hoyle. "Brief Report of a Test of Differential Alcohol Risk Using Sibling Attributions of Paternal Alcoholism." Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 72,6 (November 2011): 1037-1040.
2. Harford, Thomas C.
Yi, Hsiao-Ye
Grant, Bridget F.
Five-year Diagnostic Utility of "Diagnostic Orphans" for Alcohol Use Disorders in a National Sample of Young Adults
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 71,3 (May 2010); 410-417.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/The_FiveYear_Diagnostic_Utility_of_Diagnostic_Orphans_for_Alcohol_Use_Di/4455.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; Diagnostic Orphans; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study was conducted to assess the association of "diagnostic orphans" at baseline and subsequent development of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) alcohol use disorders (AUDs) 5 years later. Method: A sample of 8,534 respondents was drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for the years 1989 and 1994. Diagnostic orphans were defined as respondents who met one or two alcohol dependence symptom criteria but did not meet the criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence. Using multinomial logistic regression analysis, 1994 assessments of DSM-IV AUD were regressed on 1989 baseline assessments of diagnostic orphan status and DSM-IV AUD. In addition to demographic characteristics, other background variables included heavy episodic drinking at baseline and early problem behaviors (antisocial behaviors, illicit substance use, and age at onset of alcohol use). Results: Findings from this 5-year prospective study indicate that diagnostic orphan status at baseline was predictive of DSM-IV AUD at follow-up. These associations remained significant when other early behavioral problems were included in the models. Conclusions: The present findings have important diagnostic implications for the proposed DSM-V, particularly for a dimensional diagnosis incorporating less severe forms of alcohol dependence. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs, 71, 410-417, 2010).
Bibliography Citation
Harford, Thomas C., Hsiao-Ye Yi and Bridget F. Grant. "Five-year Diagnostic Utility of "Diagnostic Orphans" for Alcohol Use Disorders in a National Sample of Young Adults." Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 71,3 (May 2010); 410-417.
3. Jones, Alison Snow
Maternal Alcohol Abuse/Dependence, Children's Behavior Problems, and Home Environment: Estimates from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Using Propensity Score Matching
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 68,2 (March 2007): 266-275.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Maternal_Alcohol_AbuseDependence_Childrens_Behavior_Problems_and_Home_E/2118.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Life Cycle Research; Mothers; Propensity Scores

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Propensity score (PS) matching was used to investigate the relationship between maternal alcohol abuse (AA) and alcohol dependence (AD), based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria and three child outcomes: child behavior problems and two characteristics of the child's home environment as measured by the Home Observation and Measurement of the Environment-Short Form, cognitive stimulation and emotional support. Method: A cohort of children (N 2,193; 49% female) whose mothers were drawn from the 1994 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were stratified by gender and matched on maternal propensity to exhibit AA or AD. Results: After matching, sons of mothers with AA/AD had higher behavior problem scores (p .05), and daughters of mothers with AA/AD lived in homes with significantly less emotional support (p .05) and cognitive stimulation (p .005). Results were robust to alternative specifications of PS regressions. Conclusions: The findings suggest that policies aimed at reducing AA and AD among young adult women with children are justified. PS matched results also suggest that school counselors and mental health providers who encounter young boys with elevated behavior problems should consider maternal AA/AD as one possible causal factor. Future research should be directed toward understanding the trajectory of these outcomes and their sequelae over the child's life cycle and toward developing improved methods of identifying and intervening with at-risk children of both genders and their mothers. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs 68: 266-275, 2007) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Studies on Alcohol & Drugs is the property of Alcohol Research Documentation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be a bridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Jones, Alison Snow. "Maternal Alcohol Abuse/Dependence, Children's Behavior Problems, and Home Environment: Estimates from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Using Propensity Score Matching." Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 68,2 (March 2007): 266-275.
4. Mink, Michael
Wang, Jong-Yi
Bennett, Kevin J.
Moore, Charity G.
Powell, M. Paige
Probst, Janice C.
Early Alcohol Use, Rural Residence, and Adult Employment
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 69,2 (March 2008): 266-274.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Early_Alcohol_Use_Rural_Residence_and_Adult_Employment/2226.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Employment; Rural Areas; Rural Youth; Rural/Urban Differences; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Rural residence was once perceived as protective regarding youthful alcohol use and its effects. Our study examined whether the relationship between alcohol use in youth and early adulthood and subsequent employment outcomes differed for rural and urban youth. Method: Data from a 20-year panel survey, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, were used to address the association between alcohol use between the ages of 17 and 26 and employment outcomes during adulthood. Early drinking experiences and misuse symptoms were used as drinking behavior measures. Rural was defined as living outside any Metropolitan Statistical Area. Employment outcomes were defined using employment status and employment quality. Analyses were weighted to reflect the stratified sample design (N = 8,399). Results: Drinking behaviors did not differ by residence. In bivariate analysis, alcohol use measures during youth were consistently associated with working more than 40 hours per week and earning irregular compensation. For three of seven employment quality measures examined, interactions between residence and alcohol use were observed in multivariable analysis. Rural youth were more likely to suffer adverse employment consequences. Conclusions: Rural residence does not appear to provide protection from the effects of drinking during youth on adulthood employment and was associated with adverse outcomes. Further research is needed to ascertain whether such differences stem from different availability of services or other characteristics of the rural environment. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs 69: 266-274, 2008).

Copyright of Journal of Studies on Alcohol & Drugs is the property of Alcohol Research Documentation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Mink, Michael, Jong-Yi Wang, Kevin J. Bennett, Charity G. Moore, M. Paige Powell and Janice C. Probst. "Early Alcohol Use, Rural Residence, and Adult Employment." Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 69,2 (March 2008): 266-274.
5. Ryan, Andrea Kay
Gender Differences in Family Formation Behavior: The Effects of Adolescent Substance Use
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 71,6 (November 2010): 938-949.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Gender_Differences_in_Family_Formation_Behavior_The_Effects_of_Adolescent_/4521.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Family Formation; Gender Differences; Marriage; Parenthood; Risk-Taking; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study extended previous research on the association of substance use with family formation behavior by assessing the effects of the type and extent of adolescent substance use in a competing risks model. Substance use was expected to increase the likelihood of nonmarital family formation overall and differently by gender. Method: Longitudinal data from home interviews with the 14- to 16-year-old respondents to the first wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (N = 4,011) were used in multinomial logistic regressions estimating the odds that first cohabitation, parenthood, or remaining single occurred before first marriage among five types of substance users compared with nonusers. Full sample analysis preceded separate analyses of women (n = 1,946) and men (n = 2,065). Results: Illegal drug use and concurrent substance use increased the likelihood that cohabitation, as opposed to marriage, was the first family type. Concurrent use of three types of substances had the largest effect on family formation behavior. The effects of singular marijuana use mattered only for men. The effects of substance use on parenthood as the first family type were significant only for women and increased the likelihood that marriage occurred first. Conclusions: The effects of substance use depended on the type(s) of substance(s) used, singular or concurrent use, and gender. Previous research regarding cohabitation was supported and extended. Assumptions that substance use leads to teenage or unwed parenthood based on the relationship of substance use to pregnancy or its predictors should be re-examined.
Bibliography Citation
Ryan, Andrea Kay. "Gender Differences in Family Formation Behavior: The Effects of Adolescent Substance Use." Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 71,6 (November 2010): 938-949.
6. Sloan, Frank A.
Grossman, Daniel S.
Platt, Alyssa
Heavy Episodic Drinking in Early Adulthood and Outcomes in Midlife
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 72,3 (May 2011): 459-470.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Heavy_Episodic_Drinking_in_Early_Adulthood_and_Outcomes_in_Midlife/4578.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Educational Attainment; Health Factors; Labor Market Outcomes; Propensity Scores; Youth Problems

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study assessed to what extent drinking patterns of young adults persist into midlife and whether frequent heavy episodic drinking as a young adult is associated with educational attainment, labor market, and health outcomes at midlife.

Method: Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we grouped individuals into three baseline drinking categories using data on the number of occasions they consumed six or more drinks on one occasion from the 1982-1984 surveys. Categories were frequent heavy episodic drinker, occasional heavy episodic drinker, and other drinker/abstainer. We used propensity score matching to compare baseline drinking groups on midlife alcohol consumption, educational attainment, and labor market and health outcomes.

Results: Frequent heavy episodic drinkers substantially reduced alcohol consumption between baseline and follow-up 25 years later. However, they were much more likely to abuse alcohol and be alcohol dependent in 1994 and be heavy episodic drinkers at the 25-year follow-up compared with the other drinking groups. After matching, there was little indication that being in a higher consumption baseline alcohol group was adversely associated with years of schooling completed by middle age, the probability of being employed, earnings conditional on being employed in midlife, and health problems in midlife. Results on the probability of surviving to follow-up were mixed.

Conclusions: Frequent heavy episodic drinking at ages 17-25 years was associated with higher rates of alcohol dependence and abuse at a 10-year follow-up and alcohol consumption 25 years following baseline but not with other study outcomes at midlife. Lack of differences in outcomes at midlife may be because of decreased heavy episodic drinking among the heaviest baseline drinkers. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs, 72, 459–470, 2011)

Bibliography Citation
Sloan, Frank A., Daniel S. Grossman and Alyssa Platt. "Heavy Episodic Drinking in Early Adulthood and Outcomes in Midlife." Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 72,3 (May 2011): 459-470.