Search Results

Author: Jekielek, Susan Marie
Resulting in 19 citations.
1. Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Children's Behavior Problems: Effects of Current Conditions and Maternal Resources
Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Family Structure; Fathers, Absence; Human Capital; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Education; Mothers, Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Cooksey, Elizabeth C., Elizabeth G. Menaghan and Susan Marie Jekielek. "Children's Behavior Problems: Effects of Current Conditions and Maternal Resources." Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1996.
2. Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Life-Course Effects of Work and Family Circumstances on Children
Social Forces 76,2 (December 1997): 637-665.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2580727
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children; Children, Well-Being; Deviance; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Structure; Fathers, Absence; Human Capital; Life Course; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

How do work and family circumstances shape young children's emotional well-being and behavior? To what extent can parental resources act as buffers against adverse effects? We investigate these questions using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for a synthetic cohort of 2,342 six- and seven-year-old children born to a national cohort of young women between 1979 and 1984. As suggested by a life-course perspective, both maternal resources and current family and parental employment conditions directly impact children's behavior problems. Maternal resources also have indirect effects through current work and family circumstances. Our results suggest that improvements in current work and family circumstances can enhance children's wellbeing, even for children whose mothers have poorer emotional and cognitive resources.
Bibliography Citation
Cooksey, Elizabeth C., Elizabeth G. Menaghan and Susan Marie Jekielek. "Life-Course Effects of Work and Family Circumstances on Children." Social Forces 76,2 (December 1997): 637-665.
3. Jekielek, Susan Marie
Do Nonstandard Work Hours Harm Relationship Quality?
Presented: Boston, MA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2004
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s):

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research examines the relationship between nonstandard work schedules and relationship quality for a sample of 1,022 dual-earner couples with children in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort. My research findings suggest a reason to be concerned for these couples. Nonstandard work hours not determined by the worker have harmful effects on relationship conflict and positive interaction, compared to couples who both work days. Yet more convincing, split-shift couples engage in more conflict, despite prior levels of this variable, suggesting that working alternating schedules is associated with changes in conflict over time. The one exception to the patterns just described above is the situation when one spouse works irregular hours that she or he himself controls --in this case relationship quality is the same for these couples as it is for couples that both work day shifts.
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie. "Do Nonstandard Work Hours Harm Relationship Quality?" Presented: Boston, MA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2004.
4. Jekielek, Susan Marie
Does the Conflict Parents Hide Affect Their Children?
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 1999
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Well-Being; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper I address the question - Do children suffer when they aren't aware of their parents' poor marital relations? I ask this question in follow-up to my earlier research. In my past work I have learned that conflict is bad for children, and so researchers suggest that if parents contain their conflict, their children should be as well off as children in healthy intact families. But, at the same time, theory suggests indirect effects of parental conflict for child well-being. Evidence indicates that unsupportive and high conflict marriages are associated with lower quality parenting, and that poor parenting in turn impacts child well-being. This suggests to me that children can still be at the receiving end of conflict, even if they don't witness this conflict. Yet, there is almost no evaluation of this possibility. It would be difficult to observe the effects of conflict children 'don't' see. A close approximation might require both parental and child reports of parents' marital relationship. The NLSY data does contain such measures. Examining NLSY children aged 10-14, I propose that the conflict parents hide from their children can still have negative ramifications for their children.
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie. "Does the Conflict Parents Hide Affect Their Children?" Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 1999.
5. Jekielek, Susan Marie
Like Mother, Like Daughter? The Intergenerational Consequences of Teen Childbearing
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses NLSY79-Young Adult data to examine the intergenerational implications of teen childbearing. Specifically, we examine the factors that are associated with the likelihood that the child of a teen mother will bear a child before age 20, and the likelihood of having a child out of wedlock. In addition, among those having a first birth, we will examine the probability of a subsequent birth. Reflecting an interest in the resiliency of children and families, we also examine factors that may be related to the children of teen mothers delaying childbearing past age 20 and having children within wedlock. We expect that disadvantages while growing up and the mother's own marital and fertility behavior will influence the likelihood that the child of a teen mother will herself/himself delay childbearing and avoid out-of-wedlock births.
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie. "Like Mother, Like Daughter? The Intergenerational Consequences of Teen Childbearing." Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2005.
6. Jekielek, Susan Marie
Non-Standard Work Hours and the Relationship Quality of Dual-Earner Parents
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 2003. DAI-A 64/06, p. 2272, Dec 2003.
Also: http://www.ohiolink.edu.proxy.lib.ohio-state.edu/etd/send-pdf.cgi/Jekielek%20Susan%20Marie.pdf?acc_num=osu1048796449
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marital Stability; Parenthood; Part-Time Work; Shift Workers; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this research, I explore the association between non-standard work hours and marital quality for dual-earner couples with children. I focus on one main question: Do the non-standard work hours of one spouse increase relationship conflict and decrease positive relationship interaction? I examine this question critically by addressing a number of additional questions: (1) Do specific types of non-standard work hours make couples more vulnerable? (2) Do non-standard work schedules cause specific types of conflict? (3) Does the presence of more and younger children cause the influence of nonstandard schedules to be more negative? I additionally address alternative explanations for the observed associations between non-standard work schedules, on the one hand, and relationship quality, on the other hand. To address my research questions I analyze a sample of 1,016 employed respondents from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth cohort (NLSY79) who were living with children 18 or younger at the time of the 1996 survey round. All respondents were married or cohabiting with partners employed at least 30 hours a week. Overall, non-standard work schedules are associated with higher levels of conflict and lower levels of positive interaction. I do not find significant differences in relationship quality for those who work evening compared to night shifts, or regular compared to irregular shifts. There is more support for the possibility that nonstandard work schedules hurt couples more than they help couples. While they do not argue significantly more about children, split-shift couples do argue significantly more about both chores and affection compared to couples that both work day shifts, suggesting that gains in regards to split-shift schedules as a childcare option may be diminished by the effect of these schedules on the quality of couples' relationships. In fact, the association between split-shift schedules and arguments about chores and responsibilities is quite dynamic. Finally, it appears that nonstandard work schedules are associated with deterioration in relationship quality over time. It also appears that some couples are more amenable to working opposing schedules because their relationships were lower in quality to start out with, and yet they continue to experience deterioration in their relationship quality.
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie. Non-Standard Work Hours and the Relationship Quality of Dual-Earner Parents. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 2003. DAI-A 64/06, p. 2272, Dec 2003..
7. Jekielek, Susan Marie
Nonstandard Work Schedules, Family, and Relationship Quality
Presented: Atlanta, GA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2003.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marital Stability; Parenthood; Part-Time Work; Shift Workers; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the NLSY79 to examine the influence of nonstandard work hours on relationship quality for a sample of 1,016 dual-earner couples with children. Across a variety of outcomes, when one spouse or partner works a nonstandard shift, this is associated with a higher frequency of arguing and lower levels of positive interaction with their partner, compared to couples that both work day shifts. Analyses also consider the influences of more and younger children on the effect of nonstandard schedules, married vs cohabiting relationships, and relationship duration.
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie. "Nonstandard Work Schedules, Family, and Relationship Quality." Presented: Atlanta, GA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2003.
8. Jekielek, Susan Marie
Parental Conflict, Marital Disruption and Children's Emotional Well-Being
Social Forces 76,3 (March 1998): 905-936.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3005698
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Marital Conflict; Marital Disruption; Marital Status; Parental Influences; Parental Marital Status; Parents, Behavior; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth to examine the question: Are children better off when they remain in two-parent families characterized by marital conflict, or are they better off when their parents dissolve their marital relationship? I find that both parental conflict and marital disruption, particularly disruption less than two years ago, increase the anxiety and depression/withdrawal of children aged 6-14 (n=1640). I also find significant interactions: Children remaining in high conflict environments generally exhibit lower levels of well-being than children who have experienced high levels of parental conflict but whose parents divorce or separate. These results support the possibility that marital disruption, following high conflict, may actually improve the well-being of children relative to a high conflict family status.
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie. "Parental Conflict, Marital Disruption and Children's Emotional Well-Being." Social Forces 76,3 (March 1998): 905-936.
9. Jekielek, Susan Marie
Parental Marital Relations and Family Outcomes: How Conflict Kids See and Don't See Impacts Their Well-Being
Presented: Los Angeles, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Children, Well-Being; Family Environment; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie. "Parental Marital Relations and Family Outcomes: How Conflict Kids See and Don't See Impacts Their Well-Being." Presented: Los Angeles, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2000.
10. Jekielek, Susan Marie
The Relative and Interactive Effects of Parental Conflict and Parental Marital Disruption on Child Well-Being
Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Well-Being; Marital Conflict; Marital Disruption; Marital Status; Parental Influences; Parents, Behavior; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth are drawn on to ascertain whether children are better off when they remain in two-parent families characterized by marital conflict, or when their parents dissolve their marital relationship. Looking at levels of anxiety & depression/withdrawal among 1,640 children ages 6-14, it is found that both parental conflict & marital disruption, particularly disruption within the previous 2 years, decrease children's emotional well-being. It is also found that children who remain in high conflict environments generally exhibit higher levels of anxiety & depression/withdrawal than do children who have experienced high levels of parental conflict, provided that their parents had divorced at least 2 years previously. The results are in accord with the possibility that parental divorce, following high conflict, may actually improve the well-being of children relative to a high-conflict family status. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie. "The Relative and Interactive Effects of Parental Conflict and Parental Marital Disruption on Child Well-Being." Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996.
11. Jekielek, Susan Marie
The Relative and Interactive Impacts of Parental Conflict and Marital Disruption on Children's Well-Being
M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Well-Being; Divorce; Marital Disruption; Marital Status; Parental Influences; Parental Marital Status; Parents, Behavior

This study uses the merged child-mother data from the NLSY to examine effects of parental conflict and marital disruption on child well-being. For a sample of 1640 children aged 6-14 in 1992, I find that both conflict and disruption tend to decrease child well-being. I find significant interactions of parental conflict and marital disruption: Children who remain in high conflict environments exhibit higher levels of problem behaviors than do children who experience similar levels of conflict, but whose parents divorce or separate. These results support the possibility that parental divorce, followed by high conflict, may improve the well-being of children.
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie. The Relative and Interactive Impacts of Parental Conflict and Marital Disruption on Children's Well-Being. M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1995.
12. Jekielek, Susan Marie
Mott, Frank L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Changes in Family, Contributions to Children's Home Environments, and Child Well-Being
Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Adjustment Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Children, Well-Being; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Studies; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Presence; Gender Differences; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective in this research is to examine the extent to which father presence/absence associations with child behavior problems reflect changes in children's home environments during the same period. I focus on children's propensity to exhibit "acting out" behaviors (Oppositional Action) over a four year interval from middle childhood (ages 6-7) to early adolescence (ages 10-11) for a national sample of 1,917 children drawn from the Child-Mother data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Previous findings from this research project suggest important differences by gender and race for the outcome of Oppositional Action. Briefly, recent absenting of a biological father appears very damaging for white boys but not for black boys. Girls exhibit generally similar patterns to those for white boys; however, black girls seem to be little affected by whether or not a father is present. In the current paper I explore the extent to which such patterns might be explained by changes in the quality of children's home environments.
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie, Frank L. Mott, Elizabeth G. Menaghan and Elizabeth C. Cooksey. "Changes in Family, Contributions to Children's Home Environments, and Child Well-Being." Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1998.
13. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Work and Family Circumstances and Child Trajectories: When (and for What) Does AFDC Receipt Matter?
Presented: Chicago, IL, Joint Center for Poverty Research, Pre-Conference on Family Process and Child Development in Low Income Families, May 7-8, 1998.
Also: http://www.jcpr.org/wp/WPprofile.cfm?ID=39.0
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Joint Center for Poverty Research
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Family Circumstances, Changes in; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Mothers, Education; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Simultaneity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper focuses on children's progress through middle childhood over a four year period, beginning with a synthetic cohort of children aged 6-7 and following them to ages 10-11. We have been particularly concerned with changes over time, seeking to link changing parental work and family circumstances with changes in the quality of parent-child interaction and with children's increases or decreases in behavior problems. In this preliminary set of analyses, we can take advantage of the longitudinal NLSY child data, and control for the initial level of child outcomes at the beginning of the study period. Thus, our main focus is on how temporal patterns of AFDC receipt are linked to changes in the quality of children's home environments, their reading skills, and their behavior. We ask three major questions. First, for the large sample of children aged 10 to 11 whom we have been following from ages 6-7, what are the patterns of AFDC receipt from year 1 through year 5? We describe those patterns, and correlate variations in AFDC receipt with the measures of maternal resources, work and family patterns over the same period. Second, are these patterns linked to three indicators of child outcomes: the quality of home environments, the child's reading ability, and the child's propensity to oppositional action (a subset of behavior problems), under varying controls? Third, following Greg Duncan's lead, we develop typologies that simultaneously consider AFDC receipt, family composition, mother's education, and mother's employment history. What are the frequencies of those types, and what are the linkages between these groups and the three child outcomes under varying sets of controls?
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Susan Marie Jekielek, Frank L. Mott and Elizabeth C. Cooksey. "Work and Family Circumstances and Child Trajectories: When (and for What) Does AFDC Receipt Matter?" Presented: Chicago, IL, Joint Center for Poverty Research, Pre-Conference on Family Process and Child Development in Low Income Families, May 7-8, 1998.
14. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Long Reach of the Job: Effects of Mothers' Work Experiences on Oppositional Action in Early Adolescence
Working Paper, Department of Sociology and Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Employment; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Fathers, Absence; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Also: Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1998

While research has examined how maternal work and family patterns affect pre-school and younger children, we are less well informed about effects in early adolescence, and in particular, how changes in parents' work and family circumstances over time may alter their children's risks for behavior problems. in this analysis, we focus on one aspect of behavior problems, propensities to oppositional action, and study its trajectory from middle childhood (ages 6-7) to early adolescence (ages 10-11), linking this trajectory to maternal employment patterns over the same time period. We study these trajectories for a national sample of 1,917 children aged 10-11 drawn from the Child-Mother data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. This is a synthetic cohort constructed by pooling children aged 10-11 in 1990, 1992, and 1994. We focus on three features of maternal employment: the extensiveness of employment, as tapped by the proportion of weeks worked over the last four years; the st ability of employment, as tapped by the number of starts and stops in employment over that period; and the quality of employment, as tapped by the substantive complexity and opportunities for self-direction of the mother's occupation. We include statistical controls for maternal and child characteristics, as well as for family compositional patterns and spouse employment characteristics. We find that the key contrasts are between mothers with no employment at any point, those with intermittent employment, and those with continuous employment. Children of those never employed are most prone to oppositional behavior problems, while those whose mothers were continuously employed are least prone, even after stringent controls for associated human and social capital, family compositional patterns, and quality of employment. Our data also suggest that low to no maternal employment has more negative effects on children not living stably with their fathers over the past four years. The quality of employment is associated with more stable employment patterns, and we find no independent effect of employment quality on early adolescent outcomes once we take stability and extensiveness into account. Earlier levels of oppositional action (at ages 6-7) are strongly correlated with levels four years later (bivariate r += . 60); multivariate beta = +.52), but earlier levels are not consistently or significantly associated with employment patterns over the four year period, and controlling for those earlier levels does not substantially alter effects of maternal employment patterns previously observed. Thus, these negative impacts of stable non-employment and very low levels of employment persist even when earlier levels of behavior problems are controlled, suggesting that they represent increases over time, not simply persistence of higher levels established at earlier time points.

Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Frank L. Mott, Elizabeth C. Cooksey and Susan Marie Jekielek. "Long Reach of the Job: Effects of Mothers' Work Experiences on Oppositional Action in Early Adolescence." Working Paper, Department of Sociology and Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998.
15. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Work and Family Patterns: Effects Across Generations
Presented: East Lansing, MI, Social Capital Conference, April 1998.
Also: http://www.ssc.msu.edu/~internat/soccap/Abstracts.htm#menaghan
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Family Structure; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent research suggests that childhood and adolescent rates of behavior problems have been rising in the US over the past two decades. At the same time, family composition and parental, especially maternal, employment patterns have also been shifting. While research has focused on how maternal work and family patterns affect pre-school and younger children, we are less well informed about effects in early adolescence, and in particular, how stability and change in parents' work and family circumstances over time may alter their children's risks for behavior problems. In this analysis, we focus on one aspect of behavior problems, propensities to oppositional action, and study its trajectory from middle childhood (ages 6-7) to early adolescence (ages 10-11), linking this trajectory to maternal employment and family composition patterns over the same time period. We study these trajectories for a national sample of 1,917 children aged 10-11 drawn from the Child-Mother data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. This is a synthetic cohort constructed by pooling children aged 10-11 in 1990, 1992, and 1994. All multivariate models include controls for cohort membership to capture effects of unmeasured secular changes which may affect the cohorts differently.
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Frank L. Mott, Elizabeth C. Cooksey and Susan Marie Jekielek. "Work and Family Patterns: Effects Across Generations." Presented: East Lansing, MI, Social Capital Conference, April 1998.
16. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Work and Family Patterns: Effects Across Generations
Journal of Socio-Economics 29,6 (2000): 587-590.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053535700001013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Size; Family Structure; Maternal Employment; Parenting Skills/Styles

Recent research suggests that childhood and adolescent rates of behavior problems have been rising in the US over the past two decades. At the same time, family composition and parental, especially maternal, employment patterns have also been shifting. While research has focused on how maternal work and family patterns affect pre-school and younger children, there is less information about effect in early adolescence, and in particular, how stability and change in parents' work and family circumstances over time may alter their children's risks for behavior problems. In this analysis, one aspect of behavior problems and propensities to oppositional action are focused on, and the trajectories for a national sample of 1,917 children aged 10-11 drawn from the Child-Mother data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth is studied.
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Frank L. Mott, Elizabeth C. Cooksey and Susan Marie Jekielek. "Work and Family Patterns: Effects Across Generations." Journal of Socio-Economics 29,6 (2000): 587-590.
17. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Children's Behavior Problems: Effects of Current Conditions and Maternal Resources
Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Children, Adjustment Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Fathers, Presence; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Explores how work & family circumstances shape young children's emotional well-being & behavior, & the extent to which parental resources buffer against adverse effects, using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth for a synthetic cohort of 2,343 children ages 6-7, who were born 1979 & 1986. Results suggest 3 aspects of current work & family circumstances are associated with lower levels of children's behavior problems: (1) the presence of the child's father in the family, (2) the mother being employed, & (3) among employed mothers, the mother working in an occupation that offers greater complexity. Maternal resources also matter: mothers with higher self-esteem, lower levels of youthful deviance, & who had avoided smoking during pregnancy had children with lower levels of behavior problems. These resources had directed effects on behavior problems when current work & family circumstances were controlled, & indirect effects through their impact s on curr ent work & family circumstances. Mothers' cognitive resources had no direct effects, but higher education helped to buffer the effects of presence/absence of the child's father. Higher cognitive resources were also associated with better current work & family circumstances. It is concluded that mothers' resources & their current work & family circumstances affect children's well-being; these effects persist despite stringent controls & are predominantly additive in form. From a policy perspective, these results suggest that improvements in current work & family circumstances can enhance children's well-being, even for children whose mothers have poorer emotional & cognitive resources. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Frank L. Mott, Susan Marie Jekielek and Lori Kowaleski-Jones. "Children's Behavior Problems: Effects of Current Conditions and Maternal Resources." Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996.
18. Wildsmith, Elizabeth
Manlove, Jennifer S.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Teenage Childbearing among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers
Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 258-283.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/44/2/258.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Mothers, Adolescent; Poverty; Risk-Taking; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article examined how early maternal characteristics, an adolescent’s family environment, and the adolescent’s own attitudes and behaviors were associated with the odds of a nonmarital teenage birth among youth born to teenage mothers. Multivariate analyses indicated that these domains were closely linked. Early maternal characteristics shaped the later family environment of adolescents (parenting quality and home environment), which, in turn, was associated with the attitudes and behaviors of teens that put them at risk of a nonmarital birth. Notably, there was variation in some of the associations by gender. Increased mother’s cognitive ability lowered the risk of a nonmarital birth for boys, but not for girls, whereas fertility expectations were significant for girls, but not for boys. There were no race-ethnic differences in the risk of a teenage birth among girls, although Black boys had a higher risk than White boys.
Bibliography Citation
Wildsmith, Elizabeth, Jennifer S. Manlove, Susan Marie Jekielek and Kristin Anderson Moore. "Teenage Childbearing among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers." Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 258-283.
19. Wildsmith, Elizabeth
Manlove, Jennifer S.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Mincieli, Lisa A.
Teenage Childbearing Among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers
Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 258-283.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/44/2/258.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Cognitive Ability; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Environment; Family Structure; First Birth; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Racial Differences; Religion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article examined how early maternal characteristics, an adolescent’s family environment, and the adolescent’s own attitudes and behaviors were associated with the odds of a nonmarital teenage birth among youth born to teenage mothers. Multivariate analyses indicated that these domains were closely linked. Early maternal characteristics shaped the later family environment of adolescents (parenting quality and home environment), which, in turn, was associated with the attitudes and behaviors of teens that put them at risk of a nonmarital birth. Notably, there was variation in some of the associations by gender. Increased mother’s cognitive ability lowered the risk of a nonmarital birth for boys, but not for girls, whereas fertility expectations were significant for girls, but not for boys. There were no race-ethnic differences in the risk of a teenage birth among girls, although Black boys had a higher risk than White boys.
Bibliography Citation
Wildsmith, Elizabeth, Jennifer S. Manlove, Susan Marie Jekielek, Kristin Anderson Moore and Lisa A. Mincieli. "Teenage Childbearing Among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers." Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 258-283.