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Source: Society of Labor Economists
Resulting in 15 citations.
1. Beltran, Daniel O.
Das, Kuntal Kumar
Fairlie, Robert W.
Are Computers Good for Children? The Effects of Home Computers on Educational Outcomes
Presented: Chicago, IL, Annual Meetings of the Society of Labor Economists, May 4-5, 2007
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Computer Ownership; Computer Use; Crime; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Returns; High School Completion/Graduates; Home Environment; Modeling, Fixed Effects

Although computers are universal in the classroom, nearly twenty million children in the United States do not have computers in their homes. Surprisingly, only a few previous studies explore the role of home computers in the educational process. Home computers might be very useful for completing school assignments, but they might also represent a distraction for teenagers. We use several identification strategies and panel data from the two main U.S. datasets that include recent information on computer ownership among children -- the 2000-2003 CPS Computer and Internet Use Supplements (CIUS) matched to the CPS Basic Monthly Files and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 -- to explore the causal relationship between computer ownership and high school graduation and other educational outcomes. Teenagers who have access to home computers are 6 to 8 percentage points more likely to graduate from high school than teenagers who do not have home computers after controlling for individual, parental, and family characteristics. We generally find evidence of positive relationships between home computers and educational outcomes using several identification strategies, including controlling for typically unobservable home environment and extracurricular activities in the NLSY97, fixed effects models, instrumental variables, and including future computer ownership and "pencil tests." Home computers may increase high school graduation by reducing non-productive activities, such as truancy and crime, among children in addition to making it easier to complete school assignments.
Bibliography Citation
Beltran, Daniel O., Kuntal Kumar Das and Robert W. Fairlie. "Are Computers Good for Children? The Effects of Home Computers on Educational Outcomes." Presented: Chicago, IL, Annual Meetings of the Society of Labor Economists, May 4-5, 2007.
2. Carneiro, Pedro M.
Ginja, Rita
Preventing Behavior Problems in Childhood and Adolescence: Evidence from Head Start
Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
Also: http://client.norc.org/jole/SOLEweb/8201.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; CESD (Depression Scale); Crime; Depression (see also CESD); Head Start; Health, Mental; Obesity

This paper shows that participation in Head Start decreases behavioral problems, grade repetition, and obesity of children at ages 12 and 13, and depression, criminal behavior, and obesity at ages 16 and 17. Head Start eligibility rules induce discontinuities in program participation as a function of income, which we use to identify program impacts. Since there is a range of discontinuities (they vary with family size, state and year), we identify the effect of Head Start for a large set of individuals, as opposed to a small set of people around a single discontinuity. We use data on females from the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of the Youth (NLSY79) combined with a panel of their children, the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1979 (CNLSY79). We focus on the impact of the program in two age groups – children 12 to 13 (using the BPI scale and an indicator for smoking habits, indicators of grade repetition, special education attendance, and obesity) and adolescents 16 to 17 (using mental health and motivational outcomes using measures of depressive symptoms (the CESD), criminal behavior, smoking habits and obesity).
Bibliography Citation
Carneiro, Pedro M. and Rita Ginja. "Preventing Behavior Problems in Childhood and Adolescence: Evidence from Head Start." Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
3. Chen, Stacey H.
Does College Teach Young Men to Smoke Pot? [Revised October 2006]
Presented: Cambridge, Massachusetts, Society of Labor Economists, Annual Meetings, May 5-6, 2006
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Behavior; College Education; College Enrollment; Drug Use; Family Background

Many studies have shown a link between education and health, though it is not clear whether the link is causal. This paper studies the causal effect of college education on marijuana use, one of the most widely discussed health-related behaviors of youths. On one hand, college may reduce drug use by changing preferences or by increasing the potential value of investments in health (e.g., as suggested by Grossman 1976; Fuchs 1982; Lleras-Muney 2005). On the other hand, marijuana is widely available on college campuses. Use of the drug may, therefore, increase as a consequence of exposure to college environment (a possibility suggested by Kremer and Levy 2003; Laibson 2001). Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey for Youth (NLSY), I estimate the causal link between college attendance and marijuana use with an instrumental-variables (IV) strategy. The instrumental variable is college cost in respondents' county of residence, conditional on a variety of family background variables, prior use of drugs, and state fixed effects. My results do not support the widely-held notion that education reduces drug use.
Bibliography Citation
Chen, Stacey H. "Does College Teach Young Men to Smoke Pot? [Revised October 2006]." Presented: Cambridge, Massachusetts, Society of Labor Economists, Annual Meetings, May 5-6, 2006.
4. Cornwell, Christopher M.
Cunningham, Scott
Sex Ratios and Risky Sexual Behavior
Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008 (Revised September 2008). Earlier versions presented PAA 2006, European Econometric Society 2007.
Also: http://client.norc.org/jole/SOLEweb/864P.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Epidemiology; Geocoded Data; Incarceration/Jail; Racial Differences; Sex Ratios; Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

Blacks have dramatically higher rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV/AIDS, than Whites. Epidemiologists have suggested that these racial disparities persist because of there is more concurrent partnering in Black sexual networks. But this invites a question: why do Blacks have more concurrent sex partners? In this paper, we emphasize the relative shortage of men in Black communities, created largely by the high rates of Black male incarceration. We argue that the sex ratio imbalance shifts the bargaining power in relationships toward men, allowing some men to take additional partners. We also hypothesize that the sex ratio imbalance affects condom use, although the direction of the effect is ambiguous. A surplus of women may make it easier for a man to negotiate sex without condoms, but if the surplus leads to additional sex partners, it also increases the risks associated with unprotected sex.

We test these propositions using data from the 2000 Census Longform and the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Geocode (which allows us to match sex ratios constructed from the Census data to NLSY states of residence). We exploit the fact that the overwhelming majority of sexual relationships occur between men and women of similar age, race and geographic location. We first estimate the effect of the sex ratio on the number of recent sex partners (our proxy for concurrency) using quantile regression, focusing the response in the right tail of the sex-partner distribution. Then, we examine the relationship between the sex ratio and condom use, using quantile regression to distinguish responses of individuals who rarely use condoms from those who typically do.

We find that the effect of moving from parity (100) to the average surplus of women (128) faced by 18-24 year-old black men adds .3 partners per year for average black male and 1-2 partners per year for black males in .90 percentile. We show that the same change in the sex ratio reduces condom-use rate for black men in .10 percentile by almost 14 points and increases the condom-use rate for median male by about 5 points.

Bibliography Citation
Cornwell, Christopher M. and Scott Cunningham. "Sex Ratios and Risky Sexual Behavior." Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008 (Revised September 2008). Earlier versions presented PAA 2006, European Econometric Society 2007.
5. Deming, David
Early Childhood Intervention and Life-Cycle Skill Development: Evidence from Head Start
Presented: Boston, MA, The Society of Labor Economists (SOLE) Annual Meetings, May 2009
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Children, Preschool; Grade Retention/Repeat Grade; Head Start; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Education; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Variables, Independent - Covariate; Wages, Adult; Wages, Youth

This paper provides new evidence on the long-term benefits of Head Start for a recent birth cohort of children. I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Mother-Child Supplement (CNLSY) to track children from before birth to early adulthood. The impact of Head Start is identified by comparing siblings in the same family who differ in their participation in the program. While this comparison is imperfect, I assess its validity directly by controlling for a wide variety of pretreatment covariates. I estimate that enrollment in Head Start leads to a long-term impact of about 0.23 standard deviations on a summary index of young adult outcomes. This gain is about one third of the size of the long-term outcome gap between children with family incomes in the bottom quartile and median permanent income in the sample, and is about 80 percent as large as the impact of "model" programs such as Perry Preschool and Abecedarian. For children whose mothers have low levels of cognitive skill, the long-term impact of the program is very large despite zero measured impact on test scores. This strongly suggests that Head Start generates skill gains that are not full captured by school-age test scores.
Bibliography Citation
Deming, David. "Early Childhood Intervention and Life-Cycle Skill Development: Evidence from Head Start." Presented: Boston, MA, The Society of Labor Economists (SOLE) Annual Meetings, May 2009.
6. Kahn, Lisa B.
Asymmetric Information between Employers
Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
Also: http://client.norc.org/jole/SOLEweb/8181.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Firms; Learning, Asymmetric; Modeling; Workers Ability

Employer learning about workers' abilities plays a key role in determining how workers sort into jobs and are compensated. This study explores whether learning is symmetric or asymmetric, i.e., whether potential employers have the same information about worker ability as the incumbent firm. I develop a model of asymmetric learning that nests the symmetric learning case and allows the degree of asymmetry to vary. I derive testable implications for the prevalence of asymmetric learning involving a new dependent variable: the variance in pay changes. Using the NLSY, I employ three distinct identification strategies to test different predictions of the model. I first test whether laid-off workers appear negatively selected compared to workers who lost jobs in plant closings, by comparing the variances in pay changes at their new jobs. I next exploit the fact that groups of workers differ in their variances in ability -- based on economic conditions at time of entry into a firm -- to show that incumbent wages track ability more closely than do outside firm wages. Finally, I provide additional evidence using the fact that learning about ability is more symmetric for some occupations than for others. All three cases favor the asymmetric learning model and suggest that the effect on wage setting is significant both statistically and in terms of economic magnitudes.
Bibliography Citation
Kahn, Lisa B. "Asymmetric Information between Employers." Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
7. Nordin, Martin
Rooth, Dan-Olof
Increasing Returns to Schooling by Ability? A Comparison Between US and Sweden*
Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
Also: http://client.norc.org/jole/SOLEweb/822P.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Cross-national Analysis; Educational Status; Higher Education; Schooling; Sweden, Swedish

Using US survey data (NLSY) and Swedish register data the relationship between returns to schooling and ability is estimated separately for each country. A significant and positive relationship is found for Sweden, but not for US. The purpose of this study is to propose an explanation to why such differences might occur. While many studies have focused on whether credit constraints results in inefficiencies in the schooling market our study answers the opposite question; if weak credit constraints lead to inefficiencies, i.e. in too much use of the schooling system by the wrong people. We argue that the US schooling system is more effectively sorting out less productive investments in education than the Swedish schooling system, and therefore it is an imperfect allocation of individuals going to higher education in Sweden that make a relationship between returns to schooling and ability to be observed in Sweden but not in the US. Since the relationship between returns to schooling and ability is the same when the schooling systems of the two countries are more similar, i.e., at lower levels of education, is indicative of that our hypothesis can be correct. The empirical findings in this study are of course not convincing evidence on its own. But the results, and the common differences in IV and OLS returns to schooling estimates, suggests and agrees with such an explanation.
Bibliography Citation
Nordin, Martin and Dan-Olof Rooth. "Increasing Returns to Schooling by Ability? A Comparison Between US and Sweden*." Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
8. Okumura, Tsunao
Usui, Emiko
Intergenerational Correlations of Skills
Presented: Boston, MA, Annual Meetings of The Society of Labor Economists (SOLE), May 2009.
Also: client.norc.org/jole/soleweb/9238.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, School-Age; Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT); Extracurricular Activities/Sports; Gender Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Labor Market Outcomes; Occupational Choice; Parenting Skills/Styles; Shyness; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction; Social Capital; Temperament

A number of studies have found that social skills (e.g., communication, interpersonal interactions, and leadership skills) are important determinants of labor market outcomes, including occupation and wages. This paper examines whether social skills are linked across generations; and whether a child's occupational choice is determined by his/her parent's abilities and personality traits. There are few studies on the intergenerational transmission of adult social skills due to a lack of data on parents' social skills. To resolve this problem, we use occupational characteristics from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) to proxy for the parents' skills. Also utilized is the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). A model of intergenerational skill following is presented. Subsequently, by constructing the appropriate measure of social skills, we find that social skills link across generations along the gender line. The correlation coefficient is computed, which measures the closeness of the direction of the multidimensional parent-child skill vectors. Skill correlation is found for father-son pairs, and the correlation is greater for whites than for blacks. White sons earn a wage premium for working in occupations that require similar skills to their fathers; whereas, black sons incur a wage penalty. This implies a transfer of occupationally-related human capital for whites, but not for blacks. Evidence for nepotism is found, when sons earn a wage premium for working in the same occupation as their fathers.
Bibliography Citation
Okumura, Tsunao and Emiko Usui. "Intergenerational Correlations of Skills." Presented: Boston, MA, Annual Meetings of The Society of Labor Economists (SOLE), May 2009.
9. Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff
Ward-Batts, Jennifer
The Effect of Child Gender on Parents' Labor Supply: An Examination of Natives, Immigrants, and their Children
Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
Also: http://client.norc.org/jole/SOLEweb/806P.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Children; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Gender; Immigrants; Labor Supply; Marital Stability; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Parents, Behavior

Research has shown that child gender affects household behavior in both developing and developed countries. Child gender affects many aspects of parents' behavior, including labor supply, marital stability, and time spent with children. Research using PSID and NLS data has found conflicting results on the direction, but in both cases, that child gender affects parents' labor supply. We explore whether parents' apparent bias may be attributable to culture, which changes slowly but may have developed in response to economic incentives, such as a higher return on investment in sons, or old age support provided by a son. We use data from the CPS, PSID, and NLS to examine U.S. parents with a young child to determine whether having a son rather than a daughter has a significant effect on parents' labor supply and whether the culture of immigrants or racial/ethnic subgroups results in different effects of child gender across groups.
Bibliography Citation
Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff and Jennifer Ward-Batts. "The Effect of Child Gender on Parents' Labor Supply: An Examination of Natives, Immigrants, and their Children." Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
10. Price, Joseph P.
Parental Time, Family Income, and Child Outcomes
Presented: Chicago, IL, Annual Meeting of the Society of Labor Economists, May 2007.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birth Order; Family Income; Family Resources; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parent-Child Interaction; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Siblings

Parents make many decisions that involve a tradeoff between the amount of time and material resources they provide to their children. In this paper I examine to what degree additional family income can compensate for a decrease in parent-child time in terms of child outcomes. I use within-family variation in the amount of parental time and family income that children receive. Parents generally allocate resources equally among their children at each point in time but the amount of resources available to distribute changes over time. This leads the firstborn child to receive considerably more time inputs from his or her parents, especially when the children are spaced further apart. The second born receives a higher level of family income at each age and this difference is larger when the two children are spaced further apart or there is a larger increase in family income.

These patterns indicate that if parental time inputs are important for child outcomes then the birth order differences will be larger in families in which the children are spaced further apart in age. If income at a point in time is important then the birth order gap will be offset in families that experience the largest rise in income. The longitudinal nature of the NSLY allows me to test for differences between siblings in various outcomes (both cognitive and behavioral) based on their birth order and spacing. As an extension, I also impute measures of parental time inputs from the American Time Use Survey onto the NSLY sample. Including both parental time inputs and family income in the same estimation allows me to calculate the rate of technical substitution between time and money in the production of child outcomes. This estimate will provide a benchmark by which to compare policies or practices that encourage parents to exchange their time for additional family income.

Bibliography Citation
Price, Joseph P. "Parental Time, Family Income, and Child Outcomes." Presented: Chicago, IL, Annual Meeting of the Society of Labor Economists, May 2007.
11. Rizzo, Michael J.
'Combating' College Costs: An Analysis of Military Reenlistment Behavior and Educational Benefits
Presented: Baltimore, MD, Society of Labor Economists Seventh Annual Meeting, May 2002.
Also: http://client.norc.org/jole/SOLEweb/fullprog.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Benefits; College Education; Higher Education; Military Personnel; Tuition

Bibliography Citation
Rizzo, Michael J. "'Combating' College Costs: An Analysis of Military Reenlistment Behavior and Educational Benefits." Presented: Baltimore, MD, Society of Labor Economists Seventh Annual Meeting, May 2002.
12. Rizzo, Michael J.
A Soldier's Choice among Job, College and Career: Do Educational Benefits Matter?
Presented: Baltimore, MD, Society of Labor Economists Seventh Annual Meeting, May 2002 (under revision)..
Also: http://theunbrokenwindow.com/writing/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Benefits; College Education; Higher Education; Military Personnel; Tuition

As traditional federal higher education student grants (Pell) have failed to keep pace with dramatic university tuition hikes, veterans educational benefits have. In this paper, I estimate a random utility model and distinguish the impacts of personal and choice characteristics on the decision of soldiers to reenlist, attend college or assume a civilian job using the NLSY79 and post-secondary schooling data from IPEDS in an attempt to understand the impacts of these educational benefits and other factors on the decision. Restricting the impacts of several military and college specific variables to affect only those choices provides additional insight.

I find that receipt of special educational benefits increases the probability of choosing schooling by 8% and reenlisting by 6%. Soldiers that contribute to an education benefit program while enlisted are 6% more likely to attend college and 11% more likely to reenlist. Those residing in states with fewer two year colleges or those who have attended some college before enlisting are more likely to choose the college option. Average tuition in both their residing and neighboring states surprisingly do not affect this probability -- likely because educational benefits act as subsidies. College choice is more likely for young soldiers and less likely for those with less cognitive ability. I also find that the choice between schooling, work and reenlistment is made simultaneously, rather than sequentially. The results also provide some support for the increasing importance we observe of two year colleges in the educational mission of many states.

Bibliography Citation
Rizzo, Michael J. "A Soldier's Choice among Job, College and Career: Do Educational Benefits Matter?" Presented: Baltimore, MD, Society of Labor Economists Seventh Annual Meeting, May 2002 (under revision)..
13. Sanders, Seth G.
Smith, Jeffrey A.
Zhang, Ye
Teenage Childbearing and Maternal Schooling Outcomes: Evidence from Matching
Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
Also: http://client.norc.org/jole/SOLEweb/826.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Maryland
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Attainment; Mothers, Education; Schooling; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates to what extent the observed correlation between adolescent fertility and poor maternal educational attainment is causal. Semi-parametric kernel matching estimator is applied to estimate the effects of teenage childbearing on schooling outcomes. The matching method estimates the conditional moments without imposing any functional form restrictions and attends directly to the common support condition. Using data from the NLSY79 [1979-to-2002 waves], kernel matching estimates suggest that half of the cross-sectional educational gaps remains after controlling for individual and family covariates. The difference between matching estimates and regression-based estimates implies that part of the conditional difference in parametric models is due to the functional assumption. The robustness check following Altonji, Elder, and Taber (2005) reveals that a substantial amount of correlation is required within a parametric framework to make the negative effect of teen motherhood on educational attainment go away. Further evidence obtained by simulation-based nonparametric sensitivity analysis suggests that the matching estimates are quite robust with regard to a wide range of specifications of the simulated unobservables. The paper suggests that the "richness of covariates makes the sample ideal for our study and makes the assumption of selection-on-observables plausible.
Bibliography Citation
Sanders, Seth G., Jeffrey A. Smith and Ye Zhang. "Teenage Childbearing and Maternal Schooling Outcomes: Evidence from Matching." Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
14. Tristao, Ignez M.
Portfolio of Employment Choices: How Important is Diversification for Unemployment Duration and Wage Loss?
Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
Also: http://client.norc.org/jole/SOLEweb/8313.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Human Capital; Modeling; Occupations; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Unemployment Duration; Wage Gap; Wage Models; Wages; Work History

There are substantial differences in unemployment durations and reemployment outcomes for workers in different occupations. This paper shows that this variation can be explained in part by differences in occupational employment risk that arise from two sources: (1) the diversification of occupational employment across industries, and (2) the volatility of industry employment fluctuations, including sectoral comovements. The analysis combines data from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages with the NLSY79 male sample. Applying a competing risk duration model, this analysis finds that unemployed workers in high employment risk occupations have 5.2% lower hazard ratios of leaving unemployment to a job in the same occupation and have 4.9% higher wage losses upon reemployment than workers in low employment risk occupations." "The data set I use is the NLSY79. Relative to other micro data sets, the NLSY79 has two distinct features that make it the best data to answer my particular question. First, the NLSY79 work history data are available on a weekly basis. Since a significant number of unemployment spells are very short, this high frequency is quite important. Second, and most importantly, the NLSY79 is one of few data sets that provides a complete work history for a specific cohort, which allows researchers to analyze completed unemployment spells. This is one of the most desirable attributes of a data set for studying labor force transitions and unemployment duration, and it constitutes a significant advantage of the NLSY79 over the Current Population Survey (CPS) data, where unemployment spells are incomplete and cohorts change over time. In addition to the advantages mentioned above, the NLSY79 also has ability measures and has lower attrition rates than other longitudinal data sets (such as the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, or PSID). The downside of using the NLSY79 instead of the CPS is that I am able to analyze only individuals of a specific cohort that is still relatively young—in 2000, the individuals' age range was 35 to 43.
Bibliography Citation
Tristao, Ignez M. "Portfolio of Employment Choices: How Important is Diversification for Unemployment Duration and Wage Loss?" Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
15. Yamaguchi, Shintaro
The Effect of Match Quality and Specific Experience on Career Decisions and Wage Growth
Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.
Also: http://client.norc.org/jole/SOLEweb/839.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; College Graduates; High School Completion/Graduates; Mobility, Labor Market; Modeling; Wage Growth

This paper constructs and estimates a career decision model where individuals search for both career matching and employer matching to understand wage growth and career mobility. Career mobility decisions and participation decisions are explicitly modeled. Findings suggest substantial returns to career-specific experience. However, college graduates' wages grow little through career-match upgrading, which results in a lower incidence of career changes than high school graduates. The finding suggests that college graduates learn about their suitable careers before they enter a labor market. The paper uses NLSY79 information on white males from the cross-sectional sample only.
Bibliography Citation
Yamaguchi, Shintaro. "The Effect of Match Quality and Specific Experience on Career Decisions and Wage Growth." Presented: New York, NY, Society of Labor Economists Annual Meeting, May 2008.