Search Results

Author: Peters, H. Elizabeth
Resulting in 39 citations.
1. Argys, Laura M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Can Adequate Child Support Be Legislated? Responses to Guidelines and Enforcement
Economic Inquiry 41,3 (July 2003): 463-480.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1093/ei/cbg021/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Child Support; Divorce; Legislation; Modeling; Parents, Non-Custodial

This article explores the relationship between noncustodial parents' willingness to pay child support, state child support guidelines and enforcement efforts, and child support awards and subsequent compliance. Our game theoretic model, which distinguishes cases of asymmetric information from cases of symmetric information, demonstrates that guidelines and increased enforcement can increase payments when awards are court-ordered but may not increase payments and could even reduce child expenditures when some payment would otherwise have occurred voluntarily. Our analyses of awards to divorced or separated mothers from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are consistent with the model. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Argys, Laura M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Can Adequate Child Support Be Legislated? Responses to Guidelines and Enforcement." Economic Inquiry 41,3 (July 2003): 463-480.
2. Argys, Laura M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Interactions between Unmarried Fathers and Their Children: The Role of Paternity Establishment and Child-Support Policies
Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Economic Association Meeting, January 2001
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Child Support; Childbearing; Children; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Involvement; Fathers, Presence; Legislation; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Nonmarital childbearing has increased substantially over the last few decades, comprising almost one-third of all births in the United States in 1995 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1997). Poverty rates for these children are high, and many rely on public assistance. Reducing nonmarital childbearing and increasing responsibility of absent fathers were important goals of the 1996 welfare-reform legislation and earlier state and federal child-support legislation. Although there is some evidence that paternity-establishment efforts increase the likelihood of child-support awards (Cynthia Miller and Irwin Garfinkel, 1999; Argys et al., 2001), until recently microdata to assess the determinants and consequences of paternity were not available. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (NLSY97) to explore the determinants of paternity and the relationship between paternity and father involvement, such as child-support awards and contact between fathers and children. Our data show that paternity is associated with increases in all types of involvement. However, if the correlation is due solely to unobserved heterogeneity, then paternity policies would not have a causal effect on involvement. In this paper we model the paternity and father-involvement decisions jointly. Our results suggest that welfare, child-support, and paternity policies do alter the probability of establishing paternity, and that exogenous increases in paternity can affect father-child interactions.
Bibliography Citation
Argys, Laura M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Interactions between Unmarried Fathers and Their Children: The Role of Paternity Establishment and Child-Support Policies." Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Economic Association Meeting, January 2001.
3. Argys, Laura M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Patterns of Nonresident-Father Involvement
In: Social Awakening: Adolescent Behavior as Adulthood Approaches. R.T. Michael, ed. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2001: pp. 49-78
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Child Support; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Influence

Chapter: To examine nonresident-father involvement, this study analyzed a cohort of adolescent youth from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort. A sample of adolescents (aged 12-16 yrs) who did not live full-time with their fathers were extracted. First, the father-involvement measures for youths whose fathers were absent because they either divorced, separated, or never married the child's mother were compared, and the determinants of these father-child involvement measures were examined. The specific measures of involvement that were focused on include the amount of contact, level of child support, and quality of father-child and mother-father interaction. Second, the data were used to classify the children in nonmarital families into groups based on type of paternity establishment (i.e., voluntary acknowledgement, involuntary acknowledgement, and no acknowledgement) and show how different measures of father involvement vary by type of paternity establishment. The findings were generally consistent with those of studies using other data. However, lower levels of father-child contact were found. Adolescents whose paternity was established received more child support and experienced more father-child contact. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2000 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Argys, Laura M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Patterns of Nonresident-Father Involvement" In: Social Awakening: Adolescent Behavior as Adulthood Approaches. R.T. Michael, ed. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2001: pp. 49-78
4. Argys, Laura M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Smith, Judith R.
Contributions of Absent Fathers to Child Well-being: The Impact of Child Support Dollars and Father-Child Contact
Presented: Bethesda, MD, Conference on Father Involvement, October 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Support; Children, Behavioral Development; Cognitive Development; Family Background; Family Income; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Involvement; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we address three questions. First, other than its role in increasing income, does the receipt of child support have additional beneficial effects for children with absent fathers? Second, do the effects of child support differ when child support awards and payments are made cooperatively as opposed to non-cooperatively (eg., court ordered). Third, how do family policies affect the probability of child support awards and payments, and, in particular, the probability of cooperative awards and payments? In regressions that control for family income and other socio-economic family background characteristics, we find that child support receipt has additional positive effects on some measures of children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes. The effect varies by the type of outcome, race, and reason for father's absence. Cooperative child support awards and payments appear to be more beneficial than child support that is court ordered. Turning to our policy variables, we see that child support guidelines promote awards that are cooperative, while increases in the paternity establishment rate increases court ordered (i.e. non-cooperative) awards. More generous state welfare benefits reduce court ordered awards, but do not reduce cooperative awards.
Bibliography Citation
Argys, Laura M., H. Elizabeth Peters, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn and Judith R. Smith. "Contributions of Absent Fathers to Child Well-being: The Impact of Child Support Dollars and Father-Child Contact." Presented: Bethesda, MD, Conference on Father Involvement, October 1996.
5. Argys, Laura M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Smith, Judith R.
The Impact of Child Support on Cognitive Outcomes of Young Children
Demography 35,2 (May 1998): 159-173.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/du641383632n8048/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Child Support; Children, Preschool; Cognitive Development; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Absence; Intelligence; Marital Status; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Variables, Instrumental; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child data to address three questions. First, does the receipt of child support have beneficial effects for children with absent fathers apart from increasing income? Second, do the effects of child support differ when child-support awards and payments are made cooperatively as opposed to being court ordered? Third, are any positive effects of child support solely a product of unmeasured differences among fathers and families? Controlling for the socioeconomic characteristics of the child and family, we find some evidence that receipt of child support has a positive impact on children's cognitive test scores over and above its contribution to total income. However, the effects vary by test, by race, and by reason for father's absence. Our results also indicate that the distinction between cooperative and noncooperative awards is important. Finally, our instrumental variables estimates show that the effects of child support persist after we control for unobserved characteristics of fathers and families.
Bibliography Citation
Argys, Laura M., H. Elizabeth Peters, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn and Judith R. Smith. "The Impact of Child Support on Cognitive Outcomes of Young Children." Demography 35,2 (May 1998): 159-173.
6. Argys, Laura M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Waldman, Donald M.
Can the Family Support Act Put Some Life Back Into Deadbeat Dads?
Journal of Human Resources 36,2 (Spring 2001): 226-252.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3069658
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Child Support; Children; Divorce; Fathers, Absence; Parents, Single

Federal legislation mandates the use of child-support guidelines to improve adequacy and horizontal equity of child-support awards. Using state guideline formulas, and a sample of women drawn from the NLSY we compare the effects of guidelines on children born out of wedlock versus children whose parents divorced or separated. Our analyses indicate that guidelines increase the probability of child-support awards for children born out of wedlock. Guidelines also reduce variation in awards by eliminating outliers, not by equalizing awards across the entire distribution. Awards for high-income divorced or separated fathers fall substantially below the guideline amount.
Bibliography Citation
Argys, Laura M., H. Elizabeth Peters and Donald M. Waldman. "Can the Family Support Act Put Some Life Back Into Deadbeat Dads?" Journal of Human Resources 36,2 (Spring 2001): 226-252.
7. Astone, Nan Marie
Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
How Do Men's Work Lives Change After Fatherhood?
Presented: Ithaca, NY, Cornell Evolving Family Conference on New Data On Fathers, An Examination of Recent Trends in Fatherhood and Father Involvement, September 2006.
Also: http://www.socialsciences.cornell.edu/0407/Fatherhood%20Abstracts.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for the Social Sciences - Cornell University
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Ethnic Differences; Fatherhood; Marital Status; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Racial Differences; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we examine how various aspects of men's work lives change when they become fathers and whether or not these changes vary by the marital status of the birth and by ethnicity. Our data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). We use fixed effects models to measure intra-individual change in employment status, number of hours worked and wages. Preliminary findings suggest that becoming a father within marriage is associated with an increase in the number of hours worked among both European and African American men. Becoming a father outside marriage is also associated with an increase in the number of hours worked among European American men, but not African Americans.
Bibliography Citation
Astone, Nan Marie, Jacinda K. Dariotis, Freya L. Sonenstein, Joseph H. Pleck and H. Elizabeth Peters. "How Do Men's Work Lives Change After Fatherhood?." Presented: Ithaca, NY, Cornell Evolving Family Conference on New Data On Fathers, An Examination of Recent Trends in Fatherhood and Father Involvement, September 2006.
8. Averett, Susan L.
Gennetian, Lisa Anoush
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Fathers as Providers of Child Care
Presented: Bethesda, MD, Conference on Father Involvement, October 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; Child Development; Cognitive Development; Family Studies; Fathers, Involvement; Maternal Employment; Part-Time Work; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Sex Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Fathers are an important, but understudied, source of child care. In this paper we address two questions. First, what are the patterns of father care, and second, what are the cognitive and socio-emotional developmental consequences for children with working mothers whose fathers provide care? We find that father care is often used in conjunction with other forms of child care. Fathers are most likely to provide care when the mothers are working a non-day shift or are working part-time. The consequences of father care for a child's cognitive development differ by the age of the child. Father care during the first year of a child's life has a positive impact on developmental outcomes relative to other types of child care. In contrast, children in nonparental modes of child care have better cognitive outcomes in the second and third years. Nonparental care during the second or third year provides opportunities for cognitive stimulation and social interaction with peers and no nparental adults that may be less available to children who are cared for by their fathers.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., Lisa Anoush Gennetian and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Fathers as Providers of Child Care." Presented: Bethesda, MD, Conference on Father Involvement, October 1996.
9. Averett, Susan L.
Gennetian, Lisa Anoush
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Paternal Child Care and Children's Development
Journal of Population Economics 18,3 (September 2005): 391-414.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p63563120r7688h5/fulltext.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; Family Income; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Fathers, Presence; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses the NLSY-Child data to assess the effects on cognitive and social-emotional development of father care as a child care arrangement among children in two-parent families with working mothers. Our results show that father care for infants is no better or worse than other types of arrangements. However, toddlers in non-paternal modes of child care (e.g., relatives, family day care or center care) have slightly better cognitive outcomes than those whose fathers provided care. Although our analyses do not provide a definitive explanation for this finding, there is a substantial influx of fathers in our data who provide child care in years 2 and 3 and these fathers appear compositionally different from fathers who provided care during a child's infancy. In particular, there is some indication that these fathers who are newly providing care during a child's toddler years may be temporary care providers due to changing economic circumstances.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., Lisa Anoush Gennetian and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Paternal Child Care and Children's Development." Journal of Population Economics 18,3 (September 2005): 391-414.
10. Averett, Susan L.
Gennetian, Lisa Anoush
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Patterns and Determinants of Paternal Child Care During a Child's First Three Years of Life
Marriage and Family Review 29,2-3 (2000): 115-136.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J002v29n02_08
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Child Care; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Foster Care; Hispanics; Racial Differences; Work Hours

This study examined patterns and determinants of father care of young children while mothers are working. The authors use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), a nationally representative sample of individuals born from 1957 through 1964 who were interviewed as teenagers and reinterviewed every subsequent year. The final sample for this study included 1188 children and their 863 mothers. The results showed that full-time working mothers are less likely to use father care. Fathers in occupations that require non-day shifts are more likely to provide child care. While some studies have shown that fathers are more likely to provide care if they are unemployed, the data here show that fathers who provide care are no more likely to be unemployed than fathers who do not provide care. Of all the children in the sample whose mothers worked during their first year of life, 4.2% were cared for exclusively by their fathers and 4.4% were cared for by their fathers and some other care provider. Children who lived in states where the costs of child care are higher were more likely to be cared for exclusively by fathers. Hispanics were less likely to use only father care, and families in which the mother identified with traditional gender roles were less likely to use father only care. Families living in the South were less likely to use some father care. The determinants of father care varied with the extent of the care provides as well as with the age of the child. Working mothers who identified with traditional gender role patterns were less likely to use father care exclusively during the child's first year, but the effect becomes insignificant if the child had both father care and other types of care. Work schedules were generally important in predicting the use of father care with other care. While Hispanics were less likely to provide father care, those living in areas with high unemployment were more likely to provide care. Whites and African Americans living in areas of high unemployment were less likely to provide father care. These findings suggest that one way to increase father involvement is to support flexible work schedules for fathers.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., Lisa Anoush Gennetian and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Patterns and Determinants of Paternal Child Care During a Child's First Three Years of Life." Marriage and Family Review 29,2-3 (2000): 115-136.
11. Averett, Susan L.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Gennetian, Lisa Anoush
Patterns and Determinants of Paternal Child Care During a Child's First Three Years of Life
In: Fatherhood: Research, Interventions, and Policies, Volume 1. H. E. Peters and R. D. Day, eds. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press, Inc., 2000.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Child Care; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Presence; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

Also co-published simultaneously in Marriage and Family Review 29, 2/3 and 4, 2000

Conference: Conference on Father Involvement (Oct 1996 : Bethesda, MD, US). This paper uses retrospective child care data from the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine the patterns and determinants of paternal child care during a child's 1st 3 yrs of life. Data were from 2-parent families and focused on 1,188 children of 863 mothers who worked sometime between the child's birth date and the child's 3rd birthday. It was found that father care is a fairly stable form of care; the average number of months that father care is used during a year is similar to the duration of other forms of child care. Paternal care is often used in conjunction with other types of child care including relative, nonrelative, and center care. Findings also show that different characteristics predict paternal child care according to the timing and extent of care. For those fathers who are the exclusive providers of child care during the 1st yr of life, the incidence of paternal child care is associated with race or ethnicity and a mother's identification with nontraditional gender roles. For those fathers who provide some of the total care during the 1st 3 yrs of a child's life, the incidence of paternal child care is more highly associated with the flexibility of a mother's and father's work schedule. ((c) 2000 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved). Note(s): An earlier version was presented at the Conference on Father Involvement and at the annual meetings of the Population Association of America, Mar, 1997.; Special Issue: Fatherhood: Research, interventions and policies. Part I.

Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., H. Elizabeth Peters and Lisa Anoush Gennetian. "Patterns and Determinants of Paternal Child Care During a Child's First Three Years of Life" In: Fatherhood: Research, Interventions, and Policies, Volume 1. H. E. Peters and R. D. Day, eds. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press, Inc., 2000.
12. Averett, Susan L.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Waldman, Donald M.
Tax Credits, Labor Supply and Child Care
Report No 92-9. Chicago IL: Population Research Center, NORC-University of Chicago, November 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Child Care; Children; Labor Force Participation; Maternal Employment; Taxes; Women

This paper is a theoretical and empirical exploration of the effects of the child care tax credit in the U.S. income tax system on female labor supply and choice of child care arrangements. The tax credit provides a subsidy to working families towards the purchase of child care. This subsidy creates a nonlinear budget set similar to that created by a progressive income tax. Data from the 1986 interview of the youth cohort of the NLS are utilized to estimate the labor supply function of women with young children. Our estimates control for the type of child care arrangements made, explicitly allowing women to use market care or informal care. Our empirical work demonstrates that married women's labor supply is elastic with respect to the wage net of child care costs and the child care tax credit. Furthermore, we find that increasing the value (percent of expenditures subsidized) of the child care tax credit will increase hours supplied to the labor market by married women with children under age six.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., H. Elizabeth Peters and Donald M. Waldman. Tax Credits, Labor Supply and Child Care. Report No 92-9. Chicago IL: Population Research Center, NORC-University of Chicago, November 1992.
13. Averett, Susan L.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Waldman, Donald M.
Tax Credits, Labor Supply and Child Care: Theory and Measurement
Presented: Denver, CO, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior; Child Care; Children; Labor Force Participation; Labor Supply; Taxes; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While the increase in labor supply of mothers with young children since World War II is a well known phenomena, little is understood about the role child care costs play in this increase. This paper is a theoretical and empirical exploration of the effects of the child care tax credit inherent in the U.S. income tax system on female labor supply and choice of child care arrangements. This tax credit provides a subsidy to working families towards both the quantity and quality of child care purchased. This subsidy creates a nonlinear budget set similar to that of a progressive income tax. Data from the NLSY are utilized to estimate the labor supply function of women with young children. The estimates control for the type of child care arrangements made, explicitly allowing women to use market care and informal care. These results give an estimate of the behavioral impacts of subsidizing child care and should be of interest to policy makers.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., H. Elizabeth Peters and Donald M. Waldman. "Tax Credits, Labor Supply and Child Care: Theory and Measurement." Presented: Denver, CO, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1992.
14. Averett, Susan L.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Waldman, Donald M.
Tax Credits, Labor Supply, and Child Care
The Review of Economics and Statistics 79,1 (February 1997): 125-135.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2951439
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Child Care; Labor Supply; Marital Status; Modeling; Taxes; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We explore the impact of the child care tax credit in the U.S. income tax system on the labor supply decisions of married women with young children by incorporating the cost of child care into a structural labor supply model. Using data from the 1986 NLSY, we find that government subsidies to child care increase labor supply substantially. Our policy simulations show that an increase in the value of the child care tax credit (i.e., percent of expenditures subsidized) would have a much larger effect on labor supply than an increase in the annual expenditure limits of the subsidy or making the subsidy refundable. (Copyright 1997 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.)
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., H. Elizabeth Peters and Donald M. Waldman. "Tax Credits, Labor Supply, and Child Care." The Review of Economics and Statistics 79,1 (February 1997): 125-135.
15. Baker, Paula C.
Crowley, Joan E.
D'Amico, Ronald
Falaris, Evangelos M.
Morgan, William R.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Willke, Richard
Pathways to the Future, Volume V: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1983
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior; Business Cycles; College Enrollment; Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA); Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Job Training; Training, Post-School; Transition, School to Work

This report describes the work experience of the nationally-representative sample of 12,000 Americans who were age 14-21 when first interviewed in 1979 and who have been surveyed annually since then. Willke -- Chapter One evaluates outcomes for post-school participants in government employment and training programs with special attention given to selectivity bias. D'Amico & Baker -- Chapter Two describes early labor market differentiation among terminal high school graduates. Morgan -- Chapter Three analyzes business cycle effects on college enrollment behavior. Crowley -- Chapter Four provides a descriptive analysis of welfare patterns among young mothers. Falaris & Peters -- Chapter Five discusses the effect of demographic factors on schooling and entry wages.
Bibliography Citation
Baker, Paula C., Joan E. Crowley, Ronald D'Amico, Evangelos M. Falaris, William R. Morgan, H. Elizabeth Peters and Richard Willke. "Pathways to the Future, Volume V: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1983." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985.
16. Covington, Reginald
Monson, William
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Price, Joseph P.
Sabia, Joseph J.
The Consequences of Teen Fatherhood: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97
Presented: Bethesda MD, National Center for Family and Marriage Research's Fathers and Fathering in Contemporary Contexts Research Conference, May 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Civic Engagement; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Parenthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research Questions:

What are the consequences of having a teen birth on a variety of educational and economic outcomes and on civic engagement?
What are the differences in effects for teen mothers compared to teen fathers?
How have the consequences of teen parenthood changed across cohorts?
How stable are the results across different methods used to account for selection into teen parenthood

Conclusions:

Having a teen birth has negative consequences for a variety of outcomes
Some Consequences are similar for man and Women: Education; Civic engagement measures (except charitable giving)
Other consequences affect women primarily: Charitable giving; Poverty; Food stamp receipt
Many results are robust across multiple methods to account for selection: Education; Charitable giving (for women)
Other results become insignificant when using methods that account for unobservables: Civic engagement measures (except charitable giving); Food stamp receipt; Poverty

Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, William Monson, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph P. Price and Joseph J. Sabia. "The Consequences of Teen Fatherhood: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97." Presented: Bethesda MD, National Center for Family and Marriage Research's Fathers and Fathering in Contemporary Contexts Research Conference, May 2012.
17. Covington, Reginald
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Price, Joseph P.
Sabia, Joseph J.
Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97
Presented: European Conference On Health Economics (ECHE), July 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Swiss Association for Health Economics
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Civic Engagement; College Education; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; High School Completion/Graduates; Parenthood; Propensity Scores; Volunteer Work; Voting Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from two cohorts of youths from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 and 1997 we estimate the effect of teen parenthood on educational attainment. Across a number of econometric strategies designed to control for measured and unmeasured heterogeneity—including propensity score matching, family fixed effects and instrumental variables—we find that teen fatherhood is associated with a lower probability of high school graduation and college attendance. While the magnitudes of the adverse schooling effects are larger for teen mothers than for teen fathers in the NLSY79 cohort, the costs of fatherhood increased in the NLSY97 cohort, narrowing the gap between men and women.
Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph P. Price and Joseph J. Sabia. "Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97." Presented: European Conference On Health Economics (ECHE), July 2012.
18. Covington, Reginald
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Three Cohorts of Youth
Working Paper, Cornell University, October 2011.
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Department of Economics, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Propensity Scores; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While a large number of studies have explored the schooling effects of teen motherhood, very few have examined the consequences of teen fatherhood. Using data drawn from two cohorts of youth from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and 1997 (NLSY79 and NLSY97), we examine the relationship between teen parenthood and educational attainment, with careful attention to the role of family- and individual-level unmeasured heterogeneity. We find that teen mothers had a larger schooling penalty than teen fathers in the earlier cohort, but this difference appears to have diminished over time, with men in the NLSY97 cohort having a larger educational penalty than those from the NLSY79 cohort.
Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph J. Sabia and Joseph P. Price. "Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Three Cohorts of Youth." Working Paper, Cornell University, October 2011.
19. Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Joyner, Kara
Curtin, Sally C.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sexual Behaviors Across 9 National Cohorts of Young Males and Females Ages 15-19
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
Also: http://paa2011.princeton.edu/download.aspx?submissionId=112016
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); National Survey of Adolescent Males (NSAM); National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Pregnancy, Adolescent; Sexual Behavior; Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Overview
Although adolescent pregnancy and STI/HIV transmission are preventable, (1) youth aged 15 to 24 contribute 18.9 million new STD cases in the US annually, (2) youth under age 20 account for 750,000 pregnancies a year, and (3) youth aged 15 to 24 were responsible for 20,000 new HIV cases, half of the 40,000 total, in 2006. What places these youth at risk are their sexual behaviors, with timing of first sex denoting the length of risk exposure.

Using nine nationally representative cohorts (NSLY79, NSAM88, NSFG88, NSAM95, NSFG95, ADD-Health, NLSY97, NSFG2002, and NLSY79YA), we examine cohort and sex differences in being sexually experienced and corroborate associations and trends across different data sets. Our samples are limited to male and female never-married youth ages 15 to 19 at the time they were reporting on their sexual behavior. We identify trends over time in being sexually experienced for 15 to 19 year old males and females. We find a monotonic decrease in the percent of 15-19 year old males being sexually experienced over cohorts. For females aged 15-19, we find an increase and then decrease from earlier to later cohorts. These results have significant implications for public health sexual outcomes among youth and for studies that examine sexually experienced youth, especially timing of first sex.

Bibliography Citation
Dariotis, Jacinda K., Kara Joyner, Sally C. Curtin, Freya L. Sonenstein, Kristin Anderson Moore and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Sexual Behaviors Across 9 National Cohorts of Young Males and Females Ages 15-19." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
20. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Leveling the Peaks and Troughs of the Demographic Cycle: An Application to School Enrollment Rates: A Comment
Review of Economics and Statistics 73,3 (August 1991): 572-575.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2109589
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Behavior; Demography; Income; Labor Supply; Schooling; Unemployment; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We present new evidence which rejects Wachter and Wascher's (1984) timing hypothesis of the effect of the demographic cycle on schooling. e formalize the timing hypothesis in the context of a statistical model and argue that the timing hypothesis implies certain restrictions on the parameters of the model. Using more detailed data than those used by Wachter and Wascher, we estimate the model, test the restrictions, and reject the timing hypothesis. The study of Wachter and Wascher has enhanced our understanding of the effects of the demographic cycle on individual behavior by showing that individuals do not passively suffer the adverse consequences of a baby boom on their economic well-being, but they alter their investment in schooling in response to such a demographic phenomenon. We have further explored and clarified the relation between the demographic cycle, schooling attainment and the timing of its completion.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Leveling the Peaks and Troughs of the Demographic Cycle: An Application to School Enrollment Rates: A Comment." Review of Economics and Statistics 73,3 (August 1991): 572-575.
21. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
New Evidence on the Effect of the Demographic Cycle on the Timing of School Completion
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Delaware, 1988
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Delaware
Keyword(s): Behavior; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Gender Differences; Modeling; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Schooling; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents new evidence which rejects the timing hypothesis of the effect of the demographic cycle on schooling which was proposed by Wachter and Wascher (1984). The authors formalize the timing hypothesis in the context of a statistical model and argue that the timing hypothesis implies certain restrictions on the parameters of this model. Using more detailed data than those used by Wachter and Wascher, we estimate the model, test the restrictions, and reject the timing hypothesis. The study of Wachter and Wascher has enhanced our understanding of the effects of the demographic cycle on individual behavior by showing that individuals do not passively suffer any adverse consequences of a baby boom on their economic well-being but they alter their investment in schooling in response to such a demographic phenomenon. This research clarifies the relation between the demographic cycle, schooling attainment and the timing of its completion.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "New Evidence on the Effect of the Demographic Cycle on the Timing of School Completion." Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Delaware, 1988.
22. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Responses of Female Labor Supply and Fertility to the Demographic Cycle
NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-9, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 1989.
Also: Final Report, U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1989.
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Fertility; First Birth; Labor Supply; Wages; Women

This paper proposes a model according to which women alter the timing of the first birth and the return to work following that birth in order to mitigate any adverse effects of the demographic cycle on their wage profiles. The authors predict that women who were born during the upswing of the demographic cycle would have an incentive to have their first birth earlier and to return to work more quickly (holding schooling constant) than would women who were born during the downswing of the demographic cycle. The empirical evidence confirms these predictions.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Responses of Female Labor Supply and Fertility to the Demographic Cycle." NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-9, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 1989.
23. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Responses of Female Labor Supply and Fertility to the Demographic Cycle
Research in Population Economics 8 (1996): 63-89.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12320269
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: JAI Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Demography; Fertility; Labor Force Participation; Labor Supply; Labor Turnover; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Wages

We propose a model in which women alter the timing of childbearing and duration of time not working following childbearing in order to mitigate any adverse effects of the demographic cycle on their lifetime wages. The responses to the demographic cycle include both a standard opportunity cost argument women are more likely to leave the labor force when wages are low and a more complicated and forward looking cohort choice effect in which the timing of labor force participation can enable a woman to join a labor market cohort with a more favorable lifetime wage profile. We explore the reduced-form empirical implications of our model and estimate the importance of these two responses utilizing data from three cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience which include women born from 1918-1964. The hazard rate estimates of the timing of the first birth and the return to work following that birth indicate that women who were born during the upswing of the demographic cycle begin childbearing earlier and return to work more quickly (holding schooling constant) than do women who were born during the downswing of the demographic cycle. These results imply that when responding to the demographic cycle, the cohort choice effect is more important than the opportunity cost effect.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Responses of Female Labor Supply and Fertility to the Demographic Cycle." Research in Population Economics 8 (1996): 63-89.
24. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Schooling Choices and Demographic Cycles
Journal of Human Resources 27,4 (Fall 1992): 551-574.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/146075
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Demography; Educational Attainment; Life Cycle Research; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); School Completion; Schooling

This paper examines the effect of demographic cycles on schooling choices and the timing of school completion. Utilizing data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience and from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we find that men and women born during the upswing of a demographic cycle obtain more schooling and take longer to finish a year of schooling than comparable individuals born during the downswing of a demographic cycle. The patterns that we document are more complex than would be predicted by any of the theoretical models of educational responses to demographic cycles that have been presented in the literature.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Schooling Choices and Demographic Cycles." Journal of Human Resources 27,4 (Fall 1992): 551-574.
25. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Survey Attrition and Schooling Choices
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Delaware, February 1994
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Delaware
Keyword(s): Attrition; Data Quality/Consistency; Dropouts; Educational Attainment; Life Cycle Research; Longitudinal Surveys; Modeling; Nonresponse; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

It is well known that longitudinal surveys lose parts of their samples over time to attrition (or nonresponse). Little is known, however, about the effect of survey attrition on the estimates of statistical models which are obtained using longitudinal data. In this paper we propose a new method of studying the effect of survey attrition on estimates of statistical models. We apply his method to the study of schooling choices. The present paper uses data from an earlier paper (Falaris and Peters 1992) and investigates the effect of survey attrition on regressions of both schooling attainment of individuals and of the age of school completion on exogenous characteristics. This is accomplished by comparing baseline regressions estimated using all observations on individuals who were observed at a certain point in the life cycle wide regressions based on samples which exclude individuals who missed any interviews either before or after that point. In the life cycle and up to the most recent observation period which is available to us now. We use data from tie Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience Young Men, Young Women and Youth.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Survey Attrition and Schooling Choices." Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Delaware, February 1994.
26. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Survey Attrition and Schooling Choices
Journal of Human Resources 33,2 (Spring 1998): 531-554.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/146440
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Attrition; Behavior; Family Background; Modeling; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Schooling

We use data from three cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys of L abor Market Experience and from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to study the effect of survey attrition on estimates of statistical models of schooling choices. We estimate regressions using data on people who always respond to the surveys (stayers) and on people who miss some surveys (attritors) and test whether the same statistical model describes the behavior of stayers and attritors. In general (with a few exceptions) we find that attrition either has no effect on the regression estimates or only affects the estimates of the intercept (and sometimes the coefficients of birth year dummies) and does not affect estimates of family background slope coefficients.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Survey Attrition and Schooling Choices." Journal of Human Resources 33,2 (Spring 1998): 531-554.
27. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
The Effect of Demographic Factors on Schooling and Entry Wages
In: Pathways to the Future, Volume V: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1983, P.Baker, ed., Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Demography; Schooling; Wage Levels; Wages

Chapter Five discusses the effect of demographic factors on schooling and entry wages.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "The Effect of Demographic Factors on Schooling and Entry Wages." In: Pathways to the Future, Volume V: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1983, P.Baker, ed., Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985.
28. Falaris, Evangelos M.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
The Effect of the Demographic Cycle on Schooling and Entry Wages
Working Paper, University of Delaware, 1988
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Delaware
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Schooling; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the effect of the demographic cycle on schooling attainment, age at school completion, and the level of entry wages. Unlike most previous studies which assume that schooling is exogenous, the authors explicitly treat schooling attainment and the age at school completion as choice variables. The direct effect of cohort size on entry wages and its indirect effect on wages through the schooling choices of individuals are studied. It was found that both men and women change their schooling attainment and age at school completion in response to the demographic cycle. These changes lead to significant indirect effects of cohort size on the entry wages of men and of women which tend to mitigate the adverse direct effects on entry wages of an increase in cohort size.
Bibliography Citation
Falaris, Evangelos M. and H. Elizabeth Peters. "The Effect of the Demographic Cycle on Schooling and Entry Wages." Working Paper, University of Delaware, 1988.
29. Garasky, Steven
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Argys, Laura M.
Cook, Steven T.
Nepomnyaschy, Lenna
Sorensen, Elaine
Waller, Maureen
Nonresident Parenting: Measuring Support Provided to Children by Nonresident Fathers
Presented: Bethesda, MD, Measurement Issues in Family Demography Workshop, November 2003.
Also: http://www.popcenter.umd.edu/events/mifd/papers/argys.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Maryland Population Research Center
Keyword(s): Child Support; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Involvement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Gathering data from parents living separately presents many unique challenges. For example, often it is difficult to locate both parents and when they are interviewed, they tend to provide different accounts of the nonresident parent?s involvement with the same child. Further, family and household configurations are complicated by the addition of new relationships (e.g. step-relationships) that evolve over time and the dynamic nature of the residential patterns of children who often reside with different parents at different times of the year or at different times in their childhood.

Within this challenging context the authors of this paper examine the support provided by nonresident parents (specifically fathers due to data limitations) to their children who live elsewhere. Specifically, we focus on how questions related to support provision are asked and what results are found. We examine eight separate data sets: six survey-based data sets, one a compilation of data from court records, and an extract of data from administrative records of a state public assistance program. The overriding objective of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of current data gathering approaches in this area. Our goal is to provide insights into ways we can improve our surveys in this important area of family demography.

Bibliography Citation
Garasky, Steven, H. Elizabeth Peters, Laura M. Argys, Steven T. Cook, Lenna Nepomnyaschy, Elaine Sorensen and Maureen Waller. "Nonresident Parenting: Measuring Support Provided to Children by Nonresident Fathers." Presented: Bethesda, MD, Measurement Issues in Family Demography Workshop, November 2003.
30. Hofferth, Sandra L.
Forry, Nicole D.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Child Support, Father-Child Contact, and Preteens' Involvement with Nonresidential Fathers: Racial/Ethnic Differences
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 31,1 (March 2010): 14-32.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20357896
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Child Support; Ethnic Differences; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Fathers, Presence; Parent-Child Interaction; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined how child support, frequency of contact with children, and the relationship between nonresidential parents influenced preteens' reports of the involvement of fathers and mothers in their life. Data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) that has followed the children of NLSY mothers from birth into their twenties. Results showed that increases in child support and in contact with the child over time after separation are linked to a better coparental relationship when children are age 11 or 12. This better relationship between parents is, in turn, associated with greater involvement of both mothers and nonresidential fathers with their children.
Bibliography Citation
Hofferth, Sandra L., Nicole D. Forry and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Child Support, Father-Child Contact, and Preteens' Involvement with Nonresidential Fathers: Racial/Ethnic Differences." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 31,1 (March 2010): 14-32.
31. Hynes, Kathryn
Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Deleone, Felicia Yang
The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys
Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.
Also: http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol18/12/18-12.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Data Analysis; Family Background; Fatherhood; Fathers; Gender; Male Sample; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Racial Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study provides systematic information about the prevalence of early male fertility and the relationship between family background characteristics and early parenthood across three widely used data sources: the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth and the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. We provide descriptive statistics on early fertility by age, sex, race, cohort, and data set. Because each data set includes birth cohorts with varying early fertility rates, prevalence estimates for early male fertility are relatively similar across data sets. Associations between background characteristics and early fertility in regression models are less consistent across data sets. We discuss the implications of these findings for scholars doing research on early male fertility. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Hynes, Kathryn, Kara Joyner, H. Elizabeth Peters and Felicia Yang Deleone. "The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys." Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.
32. Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Hynes, Kathryn
Sikora, Asia
Taber, Jamie Rubenstein
Rendall, Michael S.
The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys
Demography 49,1 (February 2012): 101-124.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/n52u383172070883/
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Data Quality/Consistency; Fathers; Fathers, Biological; Fertility; Methods/Methodology; Monte Carlo; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Researchers continue to question fathers’ willingness to report their biological children in surveys and the ability of surveys to adequately represent fathers. To address these concerns, this study evaluates the quality of men’s fertility data in the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97) and in the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Comparing fertility rates in each survey with population rates based on data from Vital Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, we document how the incomplete reporting of births in different surveys varies according to men’s characteristics, including their age, race, marital status, and birth cohort. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations based on the NSFG data to demonstrate how birth underreporting biases associations between early parenthood and its antecedents. We find that in the NSFG, roughly four out of five early births were reported; but in the NLSY79 and NLSY97, almost nine-tenths of early births were reported. In all three surveys, incomplete reporting was especially pronounced for nonmarital births. Our results suggest that the quality of male fertility data is strongly linked to survey design and that it has implications for models of early male fertility.
Bibliography Citation
Joyner, Kara, H. Elizabeth Peters, Kathryn Hynes, Asia Sikora, Jamie Rubenstein Taber and Michael S. Rendall. "The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys ." Demography 49,1 (February 2012): 101-124.
33. Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sikora, Asia
Hynes, Kathryn
Rubenstein, Jamie C.
The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Age at Birth; Census of Population; Data Quality/Consistency; Ethnic Differences; Fatherhood; Fathers; Fathers and Children; Fertility; Marital Status; Methods/Methodology; Monte Carlo; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Researchers continue to question fathers' willingness to report their biological children in surveys, and the ability of surveys to adequately represent them. To address these concerns, this study evaluates the quality of men's fertility data in the 1979 and 1997 Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97), and in the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Comparing fertility rates in each survey to population rates based on the data from the National Center for Health Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, we document how the undercount of births to men in different surveys varies according to several of their characteristics, including their age, race/ethnicity, marital status, and birth cohort. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations based on the NSFG data to demonstrate how birth undercounting biases associations between early parenthood and its antecedents.
Bibliography Citation
Joyner, Kara, H. Elizabeth Peters, Asia Sikora, Kathryn Hynes and Jamie C. Rubenstein. "The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys." Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.
34. Peters, H. Elizabeth
Interactions Between Divorce and Its Long-Term Economic Consequences
Mimeo, Economics Research Center-NORC, 1986.
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Alimony; Child Support; Divorce; Earnings; Income; Marriage

Also: Presented: Econometric Society Meetings, December, 1986.

This paper studies the link between the expected consequences or income prospects at divorce and the decision to become divorced. The economic model utilized predicts that divorce will occur when the present value of opportunities after divorce exceeds the return to continuing the marriage. These opportunities, measured over time, include the economic value attached to a possible remarriage, as well as income from employment, welfare, alimony, and child support payments. The empirical analysis utilizes data from the Young Women's cohort. Preliminary results show that income gains expected from continuing the marriage reduce the probability of divorce, but income prospects expected at divorce have no significant effect on the probability of divorce for these women.

Bibliography Citation
Peters, H. Elizabeth. "Interactions Between Divorce and Its Long-Term Economic Consequences." Mimeo, Economics Research Center-NORC, 1986.
35. Peters, H. Elizabeth
Retrospective Versus Panel Data in Analyzing Life-Cycle Events
Journal of Human Resources 23,4 (Fall 1988): 488-513.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/145810
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Life Cycle Research; Longitudinal Data Sets; Longitudinal Surveys; Marital Status; Remarriage

In view of the large cost of longitudinal data collection, it is important to assess the quality of information about life-cycle events which can be obtained from less costly retrospective surveys. This paper compares data from a retrospective marital history with that derived for the same individuals from panel information. The data utilized in the study come from the Young Women's cohort which was initiated in 1968. In 1978, the respondents were asked about the dates of past marital events; in 1983, the retrospective histories were updated. The panel information that is available includes marital status and characteristics of the current husband (if present) at each interview date. From this source, a limited panel marital history can be constructed. The results indicate that when a marital event is reported in both sources, there is substantial agreement about the date of the event. The errors are, however, systematic, and are seen primarily to relate to factors which increase the difficulty of recall in retrospective histories. Since the panel data only ask about current marital status, some marital events cannot be correctly identified. This limitation is more important for remarriage rate estimates than for first marriage rate estimates.
Bibliography Citation
Peters, H. Elizabeth. "Retrospective Versus Panel Data in Analyzing Life-Cycle Events." Journal of Human Resources 23,4 (Fall 1988): 488-513.
36. Peters, H. Elizabeth
Day, Randal D.
Fatherhood: Research, Interventions and Policies
New York, NY: Haworth Press, 2000
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Child Care; Divorce; Ethnic Studies; Family Studies; Fatherhood; Fathers and Children; Fathers and Sons; Fathers, Influence; Fathers, Involvement; Gender Differences; Marital Status; Parents, Single

Co-published simultaneously as Marriage & Family Review 29,2/3 & 4 (2000).

Bringing together papers presented at the Conference on Father Involvement, this volume includes contributions by leading scholars in anthropology, demography, economics, family science, psychology, and sociology. Many of the contributors also address the implications of father involvement for family policy issues, including family leave, child care, and child support. Furthermore, the discussion of fatherhood ranges well beyond the case of intact, middle-class, white families to include fathers from various ethnic groups and socioeconomic classes and of varied marital status, including fathers of nonmarital children, single-father families, and nonresident fathers. Co-published simultaneously as Marriage & Family Review 29,2/3 & 4 (2000). Contents: I. The History of Fatherhood Research and Perspectives on Father Involvement. II. Fathers in Intact Families. III. Single Fathers and Fathers with Nonmarital Children. IV. Marital Disruption and Parent-Child Relationships: Interventions and Policies on Fatherhood. V. General Editors' Epilogue: The Diversity of Fatherhood: Change, Constancy, and Contradiction. REVIEW: How much power does a father have to influence his children's development? A lively and often heated public debate on the role and value of the father in a family has been underway in the US for the past decade. Nevertheless, we are far from understanding the complex ways in which fathers make contributions to their families and children. This book addresses the central questions of the role of fathers: What is the impact of father involvement on child outcomes? What factors predict increased involvement of fathers? It addresses both practical and theoretical concerns including the redefinition of fatherhood, changes over time in research on fatherhood, the predictive power of fathers' activities on their children's adult outcomes, the correlation between fathers' income and their involvement with their nonmarital children, the influence of fathers o n their sons' probability of growing up to become responsible fathers, the effects of divorce on father-son and father-daughter relationshps, and interventions that help to keep divorced fathers in touch with their children. This comprehensive, powerful book combines pioneering empirical research with thoughtful considerations of the social and psychological implications of fatherhood. It is essential reading for researchers, policymakers, psychologists, and students of family studies, human development, gender studies, social policy, sociology and human ecology

Bibliography Citation
Peters, H. Elizabeth and Randal D. Day. Fatherhood: Research, Interventions and Policies. New York, NY: Haworth Press, 2000.
37. Peters, H. Elizabeth
Mullis, Natalie C.
The Role of Family Income and Sources of Income in Adolescent Achievement
In: Consequences of Growing Up Poor. G. Duncan and J. Brooks-Gunn, eds., New York: Russell Sage Foundation, May 1997: 340-381
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birth Order; Child Support; Family Income; Immigrants; Siblings; Wage Rates; Welfare

Children who benefit from child support payments seem to fare better than those who obtain the same amount of money from welfare, according to a Cornell University study. And when child support stems from an agreement between parents rather than a court-ordered one, the children do even better.

"We now have evidence that money from child support may have a direct positive effect on children's cognitive development and educational attainment," said Elizabeth Peters, Cornell professor of consumer economics and housing.

How far children go in school also is influenced by other factors, such as family income, education of parents, family structure and composition and residential location, according to an earlier study by Peters.

"Some of these findings have important implications for policy," said Peters, an expert on the economic dimensions of marriage, divorce, child custody and child support who makes a concerted effort to bridge the gap between research and family policy. "Since we now know, for example, that fathers' child support payments have benefits beyond their economic value, we should consider this when developing policy." Cornell University, RELEASE: Jan. 24, 1997.

Bibliography Citation
Peters, H. Elizabeth and Natalie C. Mullis. "The Role of Family Income and Sources of Income in Adolescent Achievement" In: Consequences of Growing Up Poor. G. Duncan and J. Brooks-Gunn, eds., New York: Russell Sage Foundation, May 1997: 340-381
38. Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Covington, Reginald
The Effects of Teen and Early Fatherhood on Educational Attainment and Labor Market Outcomes
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Gender Differences; Labor Market Outcomes; National Education Longitudinal Survey (NELS); Pregnancy, Adolescent; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A report from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy concluded that the public cost of teen births reached $9.1 billion in 2004. Much of the literature on the consequences of teen childbearing has focused on women, although the size of the effects varies widely depending on the techniques used to control for endogeneity. Despite the fact that men's role in fertility is receiving increasing attention, very little work estimates the consequences of early fatherhood. In this paper, we estimate the schooling and labor market consequences for men, using many of the same empirical techniques that have been used for women. We compare the consequences for men and women across three different data sets, the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the 1988 National Educational Longitudinal Survey, which enable us to analyze changes in the effect of teen parenthood over time.
Bibliography Citation
Peters, H. Elizabeth, Joseph J. Sabia, Joseph P. Price and Reginald Covington. "The Effects of Teen and Early Fatherhood on Educational Attainment and Labor Market Outcomes." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
39. Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Covington, Reginald
The Effect on Teenage Childbearing on Social Capital Development: New Evidence on Civic Engagement
Review of Economics of the Household 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-017-9371-3
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Civic Engagement; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Mothers, Adolescent; Parenthood; Political Attitudes/Behaviors/Efficacy; Social Capital; Volunteer Work; Voting Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), we examine the relationship between teenage childbearing and four measures of adult civic engagement: charitable giving, volunteerism, political awareness, and voting. After accounting for selection on observables via propensity score matching and selection on unobservables via family fixed effects and instrumental variables approaches, we find that teen motherhood is negatively related to adult civic engagement. Descriptive evidence suggests that teen birth-induced reductions in educational attainment and the time-intensive nature of childcare are important mechanisms. Finally, we find that while the adverse civic engagement effects of teen parenthood may extend to teen fathers, the effects are much smaller in magnitude.
Bibliography Citation
Sabia, Joseph J., Joseph P. Price, H. Elizabeth Peters and Reginald Covington. "The Effect on Teenage Childbearing on Social Capital Development: New Evidence on Civic Engagement." Review of Economics of the Household 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.