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Source: Journal of Population Economics
Resulting in 31 citations.
1. Antecol, Heather
Bedard, Kelly
Does Single Parenthood Increase the Probability of Teenage Promiscuity, Substance Use, and Crime?
Journal of Population Economics 20,1 (January 2007): 55-71.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/kg37270100173166/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior, Antisocial; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Deviance; Drug Use; Family Structure; Fathers, Influence; Marital Dissolution; Parents, Single; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

There is longstanding evidence that youths raised by single parents are more likely to perform poorly in school and partake in "deviant" behaviors such as smoking, sex, substance use, and crime. However, there is not widespread agreement as to whether the timing of the marital disruption differentially impacts youth outcomes. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and its Young Adult Supplement, we find that an additional 5 years with the biological father decreases the probability of smoking, drinking, engaging in sexual activity, marijuana use, and conviction by approximately 5.3, 1.2, 3.4, 2.2 and 0.3 percentage points, respectively. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Population Economics is the property of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Antecol, Heather and Kelly Bedard. "Does Single Parenthood Increase the Probability of Teenage Promiscuity, Substance Use, and Crime?" Journal of Population Economics 20,1 (January 2007): 55-71.
2. Argys, Laura M.
Averett, Susan L.
Rees, Daniel I.
Welfare Generosity, Pregnancies, and Abortions among Unmarried AFDC Recipients
Journal of Population Economics 13,4 (December 2000): 569-594.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/h4rlqcavxt004b18/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Abortion; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Fertility; Modeling, Probit; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Even before the 1996 overhaul of the U.S. welfare system, a number of states had ended the practice of paying extra benefits to families who have additional children while receiving welfare. Proponents believe that this reform can reduce births to recipients, however many worry that it may encourage women to obtain abortions. Using a sample of unmarried AFDC recipients from the NLSY, we estimate a bivariate probit model of pregnancy and, conditional on becoming pregnant, the probability of abortion. Our results lend some support for the proposition that reducing incremental AFDC benefits will decrease pregnancies without increasing abortions.
Bibliography Citation
Argys, Laura M., Susan L. Averett and Daniel I. Rees. "Welfare Generosity, Pregnancies, and Abortions among Unmarried AFDC Recipients." Journal of Population Economics 13,4 (December 2000): 569-594.
3. Arkes, Jeremy
Klerman, Jacob Alex
Understanding the Link Between the Economy and Teenage Sexual Behavior and Fertility Outcomes
Journal of Population Economics 22,3 (July 2009): 517-536.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/0717263807272372/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Contraception; Economics of Minorities; Endogeneity; Ethnic Studies; Gender Differences; Racial Studies; Sexual Activity; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use individual-level data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and state unemployment rates to examine how the economy affects fertility and its proximate determinants for several groups based on gender, age (15-17 and 18-20 groups), and race/ethnicity. We find that, for 15- to 17-year-old females, several behaviors leading to pregnancies and pregnancies themselves are higher when the unemployment rate is higher, which is consistent with the counter-cyclical fertility patterns for this group. For 18- to 20-year-old males, the results suggested counter-cyclical patterns of fertility behaviors/outcomes for whites, but pro-cyclical patterns for blacks. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Arkes, Jeremy and Jacob Alex Klerman. "Understanding the Link Between the Economy and Teenage Sexual Behavior and Fertility Outcomes." Journal of Population Economics 22,3 (July 2009): 517-536.
4. Averett, Susan L.
Gennetian, Lisa Anoush
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Paternal Child Care and Children's Development
Journal of Population Economics 18,3 (September 2005): 391-414.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p63563120r7688h5/fulltext.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; Family Income; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Fathers, Presence; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses the NLSY-Child data to assess the effects on cognitive and social-emotional development of father care as a child care arrangement among children in two-parent families with working mothers. Our results show that father care for infants is no better or worse than other types of arrangements. However, toddlers in non-paternal modes of child care (e.g., relatives, family day care or center care) have slightly better cognitive outcomes than those whose fathers provided care. Although our analyses do not provide a definitive explanation for this finding, there is a substantial influx of fathers in our data who provide child care in years 2 and 3 and these fathers appear compositionally different from fathers who provided care during a child's infancy. In particular, there is some indication that these fathers who are newly providing care during a child's toddler years may be temporary care providers due to changing economic circumstances.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., Lisa Anoush Gennetian and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Paternal Child Care and Children's Development." Journal of Population Economics 18,3 (September 2005): 391-414.
5. Baum, Charles L., II
The Effects of Food Stamp Receipt on Weight Gained by Expectant Mothers
Journal of Population Economics 25,4 (October 2012): 1307-1340.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/dl121w636444r208/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Obesity; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

With over 66% of Americans overweight, expectant mothers are unusual because they are encouraged to gain weight while pregnant. Food stamp receipt (FSR) may facilitate recommended weight gain by providing resources for food and nutrition. I examine the effects of FSR on the amount of weight gained by low-income expectant mothers using NLSY79 data. Results indicate FSR decreases the probability gaining insufficient weight but does not exacerbate the probability of gaining too much weight. Examining the effects of FSR on pregnancy weight gain is important because low birth weight is more likely when expectant mothers gain insufficient weight.
Bibliography Citation
Baum, Charles L., II. "The Effects of Food Stamp Receipt on Weight Gained by Expectant Mothers." Journal of Population Economics 25,4 (October 2012): 1307-1340.
6. Berger, Lawrence Marc
Waldfogel, Jane
Maternity Leave and the Employment of New Mothers in the United States
Journal of Population Economics 17,2 (June 2004): 331-350.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/0qu7lhrhngplmlpy/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Employment; Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA); Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine the relationships between maternity leave coverage and U.S. women's post-birth leave taking and employment decisions from 1988 to 1996. We find that women who were employed before birth are working much more quickly post-birth than women who were not. We also find that, among mothers who were employed pre-birth, those in jobs that provided leave coverage are more likely to take a leave of up to 12 weeks, but return more quickly after 12 weeks. Our results suggest that maternity leave coverage is related to leave taking, as well as the length of time that a new mother stays home after a birth. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Berger, Lawrence Marc and Jane Waldfogel. "Maternity Leave and the Employment of New Mothers in the United States." Journal of Population Economics 17,2 (June 2004): 331-350.
7. Bishai, David M.
Does Time Preference Change with Age?
Journal of Population Economics 17,4 (December 2004): 583-602.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/cqtle60rh2ayukyd/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Educational Attainment; I.Q.; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Labor Force Participation; Labor Supply; Life Course; Racial Differences; Schooling; Time Preference

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study looks at compensating differentials in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) to derive estimates of the levels of time preference for labor force participants in each of 15 waves of data from 1979 to 1994. With these estimates the evolution of time preference over the life course is described. Future utility among labor force participants appears to be valued more highly by subjects who are older, more schooled, white, or male. Controlling for schooling level, a higher IQ is associated with a preference for more immediate rewards. If social rates of time preference are correlated with individual rates of time preference then population aging could create intergenerational asymmetries in the social rate of time preference. This phenomenon could make the optimal investments of young populations appear selfish to future generations that are older. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Bishai, David M. "Does Time Preference Change with Age?" Journal of Population Economics 17,4 (December 2004): 583-602.
8. Blackburn, McKinley L.
Bloom, David E.
Neumark, David B.
Fertility Timing, Wages, and Human Capital
Journal of Population Economics 6,1 (February 1993):1-30.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/g7757p8352823q02/
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Fertility; First Birth; Human Capital Theory; Life Cycle Research; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Women who have first births relatively late in life earn higher wages. This paper offers an explanation of this fact based on a simple life-cycle model of human capital investment and timing of first birth. The model yields conditions (that are plausibly satisfied) under which late childbearers will tend to invest more heavily in human capital than early childbearers. The empirical analysis finds results consistent with the higher wages of late childbearers arising primarily through greater measurable human capital investment. Revised, July 1992. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the March 1989 annual meetings of the Population Association of America.
Bibliography Citation
Blackburn, McKinley L., David E. Bloom and David B. Neumark. "Fertility Timing, Wages, and Human Capital." Journal of Population Economics 6,1 (February 1993):1-30.
9. Blackburn, McKinley L.
Schultz, T. Paul
The Effects of The Welfare System on Marital Dissolution
Journal of Population Economics 16,3 (August 2003): 477-501.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/wmny7w3n2femph8y/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Divorce; Marital Dissolution; Marriage; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The economic theory of marriage predicts that the partners' expectations of greater financial resources outside of marriage should increase the probability of marital dissolution. One potential implication is that marriages should be less stable in states with higher AFDC benefits. I study this implication empirically using data on separations and divorces among marriages involving women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. I find no supporting evidence that higher welfare benefits lead to increased rates of marital dissolution among married women with children. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Blackburn, McKinley L. and T. Paul Schultz. "The Effects of The Welfare System on Marital Dissolution." Journal of Population Economics 16,3 (August 2003): 477-501.
10. Burgess, Simon M.
Propper, Carol
Aassve, Arnstein
Ermisch, John F.
The Role of Income in Marriage and Divorce Transitions Among Young Americans
Journal of Population Economics 16,3 (August 2003): 455-476.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/4kawe3m3puxlxb3t/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Divorce; Household Income; Income; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The paper investigates the importance of income in young Americans decisions to form and dissolve households. Using data on young American men and women from the NLSY, an important role for income in both these transitions is found. There are significant differences between young men and women. High earnings capacity increases the probability of marriage and decreases the probability of divorce for young men. High earnings capacity decreases the probability of marriage for young women, and has no impact on divorce.

Copyright of Journal of Population Economics is the property of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Burgess, Simon M., Carol Propper, Arnstein Aassve and John F. Ermisch. "The Role of Income in Marriage and Divorce Transitions Among Young Americans." Journal of Population Economics 16,3 (August 2003): 455-476.
11. Garasky, Steven
Haurin, R. Jean
Haurin, Donald R.
Group Living Decisions as Youths Transition to Adulthood
Journal of Population Economics 14,2 (June 2001): 329-349.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/qcm491pdrv032t5j/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Home Environment; Household Composition; Mobility; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study follows teens through young adulthood as they transition to independent living. We focus on a little studied issue: why some youths live in groups rather than alone or with parents. This choice is important because the size of the group has a substantial impact on the demand for dwelling units; the more youths per dwelling the lower is aggregate demand and the greater is population density. Our study also adds to the knowledge of which factors influence youths' choice of destination as they leave the parental home. The empirical testing uses a discrete hazard model within a multinomial logit framework to allow for more than one possible state transition. We find that economic variables have little impact on the decision of whether to exit to a large versus a small group, while socio-demographic variables matter. We also test a new push-pull hypothesis and find that the pull of economic variables on the probability of exiting the parental home increases as youths reach their mid to late twenties.
Bibliography Citation
Garasky, Steven, R. Jean Haurin and Donald R. Haurin. "Group Living Decisions as Youths Transition to Adulthood." Journal of Population Economics 14,2 (June 2001): 329-349.
12. Gennetian, Lisa Anoush
One or Two Parents? Half or Step Siblings? The Effect of Family Structure on Young Children's Achievement
Journal of Population Economics 18,3 (September 2005): 415-436.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/y0354g4341274851/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Family Structure; Family Studies; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Do children who live with both biological parents fare better than children in other types of family structures? Does the presence of step or half-siblings affect child well-being? This study examines the effect of family structure on young children's achievement addressing two sources of potential bias: (1) misclassification of blended families and (2) the omission of within-family and individual time-invariant unobserved characteristics. The results show that family structure, when defined using traditional classifications, has little effect on young children's achievement test scores. When the definition of family type is expanded, living in a blended family and living in some types of single mother families, appears to have a small, unfavorable relationship with children's achievement.
Bibliography Citation
Gennetian, Lisa Anoush. "One or Two Parents? Half or Step Siblings? The Effect of Family Structure on Young Children's Achievement." Journal of Population Economics 18,3 (September 2005): 415-436.
13. Ginther, Donna K.
Zavodny, Madeline
Is The Male Marriage Premium Due To Selection? The Effect of Shotgun Weddings on the Return to Marriage
Journal of Population Economics 14,2 (June 2001): 313-328.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/2ch2fakefhdhm6nd/
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Earnings; Earnings, Husbands; Husbands, Income; Marital Status; Marriage; Wage Determination; Wages; Wages, Men

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In standard cross-sectional wage regressions, married men appear to earn 10 to 20% more than comparable never married men. One proposed explanation for this male marriage premium is that men may be selected into marriage on the basis of characteristics valued by employers as well as by spouses or because they earn high wages. This paper examines the selection hypothesis by focusing on shotgun weddings, which may make marital status uncorrelated with earnings ability. We compare the estimated marriage premium between white men whose first marriages are soon followed by a birth and other married white men in the United States. The return to marriage differs little for married men with a premarital conception and other married men, and the results suggest that at most 10% of the estimated marriage premium is due to selection.
Bibliography Citation
Ginther, Donna K. and Madeline Zavodny. "Is The Male Marriage Premium Due To Selection? The Effect of Shotgun Weddings on the Return to Marriage." Journal of Population Economics 14,2 (June 2001): 313-328.
14. Herr, Jane Leber
Measuring the Effect of the Timing of First Birth on Wages
Journal of Population Economics 29,1 (January 2016): 39-72.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-015-0554-z
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Expectations/Intentions; First Birth; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Labor Force Participation; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

I study the effect of first-birth timing on women's wages, defining timing in terms of labor force entry, rather than age. Considering the mechanisms by which timing may affect wages, each is a function of experience rather than age. This transformation also highlights the distinction between a first birth after labor market entry versus before. I show that estimates based on age understate the return to delay for women who remain childless at labor market entry and have obscured the negative return to delay—to a first birth after labor market entry rather than before—for all but college graduates. My results suggest, however, that these returns to first-birth timing may hold only for non-Hispanic white women.
Bibliography Citation
Herr, Jane Leber. "Measuring the Effect of the Timing of First Birth on Wages." Journal of Population Economics 29,1 (January 2016): 39-72.
15. Hotz, V. Joseph
Pantano, Juan
Strategic Parenting, Birth Order, and School Performance
Journal of Population Economics 28,4 (October 2015): 911-936.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-015-0542-3
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Achievement; Birth Order; Child School Survey 1994-1995; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Discipline; Family Size; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Parental Influences; Parental Investments; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); School Progress; Schooling; Television Viewing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Fueled by new evidence, there has been renewed interest about the effects of birth order on human capital accumulation. The underlying causal mechanisms for such effects remain unsettled. We consider a model in which parents impose more stringent disciplinary environments in response to their earlier-born children's poor performance in school in order to deter such outcomes for their later-born offspring. We provide robust empirical evidence that school performance of children in the National Longitudinal Study Children (NLSY-C) declines with birth order as does the stringency of their parents' disciplinary restrictions. When asked how they will respond if a child brought home bad grades, parents state that they would be less likely to punish their later-born children. Taken together, these patterns are consistent with a reputation model of strategic parenting.
Bibliography Citation
Hotz, V. Joseph and Juan Pantano. "Strategic Parenting, Birth Order, and School Performance." Journal of Population Economics 28,4 (October 2015): 911-936.
16. Kalenkoski, Charlene Marie
Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff
Parental Transfers, Student Achievement, and the Labor Supply of College Students
Journal of Population Economics 23,2 (March 2010): 469-496.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-008-0221-8
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): College Cost; College Education; Educational Outcomes; Employment, In-School; Modeling; Transfers, Parental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using nationally representative data from the NLSY97 and a simultaneous equations model, this paper analyzes the financial motivations for and the effects of employment on U.S. college students’ academic performance. The data confirm the predictions of the theoretical model that lower parental transfers and greater costs of attending college increase the number of hours students work while in school, although students are not very responsive to these financial motivations. They also provide some evidence that greater hours of work lead to lower grade point averages (GPAs).
Bibliography Citation
Kalenkoski, Charlene Marie and Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia. "Parental Transfers, Student Achievement, and the Labor Supply of College Students." Journal of Population Economics 23,2 (March 2010): 469-496.
17. Kawaguchi, Daiji
Peer Effects on Substance Use Among American Teenagers
Journal of Population Economics 17,2 (June 2004): 351-367.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/de0mre91u975v5qt/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Behavior; Household Models; Modeling; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Substance Use; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The widespread use of illicit substances by American teenagers has attracted the interest of both the general public and academic researchers. Among the various factors that people believe influence youth substance use, peer effects are identified as a critical determinant. Identifying peer effects, however, is known to be a difficult task. In an attempt to overcome known difficulties, I estimate peer effects on substance usage among American teenagers using perceived peer behavior in the National Longitudinal Survey Youth 97. The data indicate robust peer effects. Moreover, the results do not change substantially in school and household fixed effects estimations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Kawaguchi, Daiji. "Peer Effects on Substance Use Among American Teenagers." Journal of Population Economics 17,2 (June 2004): 351-367.
18. Keng, Shao-Hsun
Huffman, Wallace Edgar
Binge Drinking and Labor Market Success: A Longitudinal Study on Young People
Journal of Population Economics 20,1 (January 2007): 35-54.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/v044557798238035/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Income; Labor Market Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents a two-equation model of joint outcomes on an individual's decision to binge-drink and on his/her annual labor market earnings. The primary data source is the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979–1994. We show that binge-drinking behavior is quite alcohol-price responsive and is a rational addiction. A new result is that an individual's decision to binge-drink has a statistically significant negative effect on his/her earnings. Furthermore, we conducted simulations of the short-run and long-run impacts of increasing the alcohol price. They showed that that the tendency for an individual to binge-drink heavily is reduced significantly, and the reduction is greater in the long- than short-run simulation. Also, an individual's annual earnings were increased. However, in the structural model, an individual's earnings have no significant effect on his/her tendency to engage in binge drinking. Our results contradict earlier findings from cross-sectional evidence that showed increased alcohol consumption raised an individual's earnings or wages. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Population Economics is the property of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Keng, Shao-Hsun and Wallace Edgar Huffman. "Binge Drinking and Labor Market Success: A Longitudinal Study on Young People." Journal of Population Economics 20,1 (January 2007): 35-54.
19. Keng, Shao-Hsun
Huffman, Wallace Edgar
Binge Drinking and Labor Market Success: A Longitudinal Study on Young People
Journal of Population Economics 23,1 (January 2010): 303-322.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/pr751727668073n6/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Earnings; Income; Labor Market Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[Editor's note: This paper appears to have been published twice by the Journal of Population Economics. See also, Journal of Population Economics, 20,1 (January 2007): 35-54, that appears in this bibliography.]

This paper presents a two-equation model of joint outcomes on an individual's decision to binge drink and on his/her annual labor market earnings. The primary data source is the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), 1979-1994. We show that binge drinking behavior is quite alcohol-price responsive and is a rational addiction. A new result is that an individual's decision to binge drink has a statistically significant negative effect on his/her earnings. Furthermore, we conducted simulations of the short-run and long-run impacts of increasing the alcohol price. They showed that the tendency for an individual to binge drink heavily is reduced significantly, and the reduction is greater in the long-run than short-run simulation. Also, an individual's annual earnings were increased. However, in the structural model, an individual's earnings have no significant effect on his/her tendency to engage in binge drinking. Our results contradict earlier findings from cross-section evidence that showed increased alcohol consumption raised an individual's earnings or wages. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Bibliography Citation
Keng, Shao-Hsun and Wallace Edgar Huffman. "Binge Drinking and Labor Market Success: A Longitudinal Study on Young People." Journal of Population Economics 23,1 (January 2010): 303-322.
20. Lehr, Carol Scotese
Zhang, Junsen
Fertility and Education Premiums
Journal of Population Economics 16,3 (August 2003): 555-578.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/be0dhe7c1x5dfv01/
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Education; Family Size; Fertility

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines households' fertility variations in response to expected permanent shifts in the return to education. Wage premiums measure the return to education because their long-run movements are driven by factors exogenous to the fertility process. The results indicate that high education parents' fertility responds negatively to changes in the expected return to college and negatively to changes in the expected return to high school. On the other hand, the fertility of low education parents does not vary with changes to expected returns to education. These results can be consistently interpreted within a standard quality/quantity model of endogenous fertility.
Bibliography Citation
Lehr, Carol Scotese and Junsen Zhang. "Fertility and Education Premiums." Journal of Population Economics 16,3 (August 2003): 555-578.
21. Levine, Phillip B.
Zimmerman, David J.
An Empirical Analysis of the Welfare Magnet Debate Using the NLSY
Journal of Population Economics 12,3 (August 1999): 391-409.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/29ba788gy2t22ff3/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Migration; Migration Patterns; State Welfare; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the extent to which differences in welfare generosity across states leads to interstate migration. Using microdata from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) between 1979 and 1992, we employ a quasi-experimental design that utilizes the categorical eligibility of the welfare system. The pattern of cross-state moves among poor single women with children, who are likely to be eligible for benefits is compared to the pattern among other poor households. We find little evidence indicating that welfare-induced migration is a widespread phenomenon.
Bibliography Citation
Levine, Phillip B. and David J. Zimmerman. "An Empirical Analysis of the Welfare Magnet Debate Using the NLSY." Journal of Population Economics 12,3 (August 1999): 391-409.
22. Li, Kai
Poirier, Dale J.
Bayesian Analysis of An Econometric Model of Birth Inputs and Outputs
Journal of Population Economics 16,3 (August 2003): 597-625.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/kd71hvgdmytefjbl/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Birthweight; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Endogeneity; Modeling; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Simultaneity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study offers a simultaneous equations model of the birth process with seven endogenous variables: four birth inputs (maternal smoking, maternal drinking, first trimester prenatal care, and maternal weight gain) and three birth outputs (gestational age, birth length, and birth weight). The data are taken from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Our analysis conditions on twenty-nine exogenous variables including four racial dummies to account for the widely cited racial differences in birth outputs. We find that there is sizeable correlation between the disturbances in the four input and three output equations and among output disturbances, and that results from our simultaneous equations model are substantially different from those using the single-equation approach. It appears that the High/Low Risk Birth Weight Puzzle remains unresolved under our modeling framework.
Bibliography Citation
Li, Kai and Dale J. Poirier. "Bayesian Analysis of An Econometric Model of Birth Inputs and Outputs." Journal of Population Economics 16,3 (August 2003): 597-625.
23. Miller, Amalia Rebecca
The Effects of Motherhood Timing on Career Path
Journal of Population Economics 24,3 (July 2011): 1071-1100.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/wt07u085wt87134r/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; First Birth; Human Capital; Motherhood; Wage Gap; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper estimates the effects of motherhood timing on female career path, using biological fertility shocks to instrument for age at first birth. Motherhood delay leads to a substantial increase in earnings of 9% per year of delay, an increase in wages of 3%, and an increase in work hours of 6%. Supporting a human capital story, the advantage is largest for college-educated women and those in professional and managerial occupations. Panel estimation reveals both fixed wage penalties and lower returns to experience for mothers, suggesting that a “mommy track” is the source of the timing effect.
Bibliography Citation
Miller, Amalia Rebecca. "The Effects of Motherhood Timing on Career Path." Journal of Population Economics 24,3 (July 2011): 1071-1100.
24. Norberg, Karen
Pantano, Juan
Cesarean Sections and Subsequent Fertility
Journal of Population Economics 29,1 (January 2016): 5-37.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-015-0567-7
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Contraception; Demographic and Health Surveys; Fertility; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Cesarean sections are rising all over the world and may, in some countries, soon become the most common delivery mode. A growing body of medical literature documents a robust fact: women undergoing cesarean sections end up having less children. Unlike most of the medical literature, which assumes that this association is mostly working through a physiological channel, we investigate a possible channel linking c-section and subsequent fertility through differences in maternal behavior after a c-section. Using several national and cross-national demographic data sources, we find evidence that maternal choice is playing an important role in shaping the negative association between cesarean section and subsequent fertility. In particular, we show that women are more likely to engage in active contraception after a cesarean delivery and conclude that intentional avoidance of subsequent pregnancies after a c-section seems to be responsible for part of the negative association between c-sections and subsequent fertility.
Bibliography Citation
Norberg, Karen and Juan Pantano. "Cesarean Sections and Subsequent Fertility." Journal of Population Economics 29,1 (January 2016): 5-37.
25. Reed, W. Robert
Harford, Kathleen
The Marriage Premium and Compensating Wage Differentials
Journal of Population Economics 2,4 (December 1989): 237-265.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/t281u0424405km32/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Marital Status; Marriage; Wages; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Most studies indicate that male married workers earn ten to forty percent more than male single workers. Previous explanations of this earnings differential have hypothesized that this is due to a positive correlation between marital status and unobserved productivity. We propose and test an alternative explanation of the marriage premium that relies upon compensating wages and differences in workers' preferences. If male married workers are earning higher wages than single workers because they are substituting wages for nonpecuniary compensations, then it may be possible to observe the married workers receiving lesser nonpecuniary compensations. I.e., corresponding to a "marriage premium" in wages there may be a "marriage penalty" in nonpecuniary compensations. Using two samples of white, male workers drawn from the NLSY, 1979-1985, we find evidence that marital status is significantly associated with less attractive work dimensions. Previous research on this topic is reevaluated and found to be consistent with this compensating wages hypothesis of the marriage premium.
Bibliography Citation
Reed, W. Robert and Kathleen Harford. "The Marriage Premium and Compensating Wage Differentials." Journal of Population Economics 2,4 (December 1989): 237-265.
26. Regan, Tracy Lynn
Oaxaca, Ronald L.
Work Experience as a Source of Specification Error in Earnings Models: Implications for Gender Wage Decompositions
Journal of Population Economics 22,2 (April 2009): 463-499.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/fl15x021552ku124/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Labor Force Participation; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Wage Gap; Wages; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper models the bias from using potential vs actual experience in log wage models. The nature of the problem is best viewed as specification error as opposed to classical errors-in-variables. We correct for the discrepancy between potential and actual work experience and create a predicted measure of work experience. We use the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and extend our findings to the Integrated Public Use Microdata Sample. Our results suggest that potential experience biases the effects of schooling and the rates of return to labor market experience. Using such a measure in earnings models underestimates the explained portion of the male-female wage gap. We are able to separately identify the decomposition biases associated with incorrect experience measures and biased parameter estimates.
Bibliography Citation
Regan, Tracy Lynn and Ronald L. Oaxaca. "Work Experience as a Source of Specification Error in Earnings Models: Implications for Gender Wage Decompositions." Journal of Population Economics 22,2 (April 2009): 463-499.
27. Restrepo, Brandon J.
Parental Investment Responses to a Low Birth Weight Outcome: Who Compensates and Who Reinforces?
Journal of Population Economics 29,4 (October 2016): 969-989.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-016-0590-3
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Educational Attainment; High School Dropouts; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Education; Parental Investments

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study analyzes how parental investment responds to a low birth weight (LBW) outcome and finds important differences in investment responses by maternal education. High school dropouts reinforce a LBW outcome by providing less investment in the human capital of their LBW children relative to their normal birth weight children whereas higher educated mothers compensate by investing more in their LBW children. In addition, an increase in the number of LBW siblings present in the home raises investment in a child, which is consistent with reinforcement, but this positive effect tends to be concentrated among high school dropouts. These results suggest that studies analyzing the effects of LBW on child outcomes that do not account for heterogeneity in investment responses to a LBW outcome by maternal education may overestimate effects of LBW on child outcomes for those born to low-educated mothers and underestimate such effects for those born to high-educated mothers.
Bibliography Citation
Restrepo, Brandon J. "Parental Investment Responses to a Low Birth Weight Outcome: Who Compensates and Who Reinforces?" Journal of Population Economics 29,4 (October 2016): 969-989.
28. Ribar, David C.
The Effect of Teenage Fertility on Young Adult Childbearing
Journal of Population Economics 9,2 (May 1996): 197-218.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/0wumu625thlhcj3a/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Child Care; Childbearing, Adolescent; Children; Economics, Demographic; Fertility; First Birth; Heterogeneity; Mobility; Modeling, Probit

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Numerous studies of fertility behavior find that an early age at first birth increases the rate of subsequent childbearing. Typically, however, these studies do not account for the possibility of serial correlation in the unobserved determinants of fertility. Using 1979-92 individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this paper employs the Method of Simulated Moments to estimate panel probit models of annual birth outcomes. The panel probit models account for several alternative sources of serial correlation. Estimation reveals that once serial correlation is taken into account, the subsequent fertility of early childbearing are either statistically eliminated or reversed.
Bibliography Citation
Ribar, David C. "The Effect of Teenage Fertility on Young Adult Childbearing." Journal of Population Economics 9,2 (May 1996): 197-218.
29. Ribar, David C.
The Socioeconomic Consequences of Young Women's Childbearing: Reconciling Disparate Evidence
Journal of Population Economics 12,4 (November 1999): 547-565.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/1kglnxugt2gjg9nx/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Birth; Childbearing; Educational Attainment; Income; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Siblings; Socioeconomic Factors; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent studies have begun to examine rigorously the links between early childbearing and subsequent socioeconomic status. Prominent in this literature has been a set of analyses that have used sibling fixed effects models to control for omitted variables bias. These studies report that the siblings difference procedure leads to smaller estimates of the effects of teen fertility than does standard regression analysis. While it is well known that the siblings fixed effects procedure makes strong assumptions regarding the type of omitted variables and is not necessarily robust to alternative assumptions, the assumptions of the procedure have not been explicitly examined. This paper uses 1979-1992 data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to compare estimates of the income and education consequences of teenage and young adult fertility from standard regression and siblings fixed effects models with estimates from more general, alternative siblings models.
Bibliography Citation
Ribar, David C. "The Socioeconomic Consequences of Young Women's Childbearing: Reconciling Disparate Evidence." Journal of Population Economics 12,4 (November 1999): 547-565.
30. Waldfogel, Jane
Higuchi, Yoshio
Abe, Masahiro
Family Leave Policies and Women's Retention after Childbirth: Evidence from the United States, Britain, and Japan
Journal of Population Economics 12,4 (November 1999): 523-545.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/f3f0bqjxqp31eebq/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Japan; Japanese; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Maternal Employment; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses labour force survey data to examine the employment rates and employment decisions of women with young children in the United States, Britain and Japan. Our results confrm that young children have a very strong negative effect on women's employment; this effect is most pronounced in Britain. We then take advantage of panel data to investigate the effects of family leave coverage on women's job retention after childbirth. We find that family leave coverage increases the likelihood that a woman will return to her employer after childbirth in all three countries, with a particularly marked effect in Japan. This result suggests that the recent expansions in family leave coverage in the sample countries are likely to lead to increased employment of women after childbirth.
Bibliography Citation
Waldfogel, Jane, Yoshio Higuchi and Masahiro Abe. "Family Leave Policies and Women's Retention after Childbirth: Evidence from the United States, Britain, and Japan." Journal of Population Economics 12,4 (November 1999): 523-545.
31. Yörük, Ceren Ertan
Yörük, Baris K.
Alcohol Consumption and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Young Adults: Evidence from Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws
Journal of Population Economics 28,1 (January 2015): 133-157.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-014-0520-1
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Contraception; Legislation; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper exploits the discrete jump in alcohol consumption at the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) in the USA and uses a regression discontinuity design to investigate the relationship between drinking and risky sexual behaviors among young adults. Using confidential data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997 Cohort), we document that young adults tend to drink up to 2.1 days more once they are granted legal access to alcohol at age 21. Although the discrete jump in alcohol consumption at the MLDA is associated with an increase in the probability of having sex by up to 7.8 percentage points, it does not have a significant impact on the probability of engaging in risky sexual behaviors among young adults. We also document that the effect of the MLDA on the probability of using several different birth control methods is not significant for those who had sex in the past 4 weeks. These results are robust under alternative specifications and imply that although the MLDA law is quite effective in reducing alcohol consumption among young adults, spillover effects of this law on risky sexual behaviors are relatively limited.
Bibliography Citation
Yörük, Ceren Ertan and Baris K. Yörük. "Alcohol Consumption and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Young Adults: Evidence from Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws." Journal of Population Economics 28,1 (January 2015): 133-157.